BIOC33H3 Lecture Notes - Entecavir, Hepatitis D, Asterixis

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25 Mar 2013
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Chapter 44: Liver, Pancreas, and Biliary Tract Problems
JAUNDICE
Jaundice, a yellowish discoloration of body tissues, results from an alteration in normal bilirubin
metabolism or flow of bile into the hepatic or biliary duct systems.
The three types of jaundice are hemolytic, hepatocellular, and obstructive.
o Hemolytic (prehepatic) jaundice is due to an increased breakdown of red blood cells
(RBCs), which produces an increased amount of unconjugated bilirubin in the blood.
o Hepatocellular (hepatic) jaundice results from the liver’s altered ability to take up
bilirubin from the blood or to conjugate or excrete it.
o Obstructive (posthepatic) jaundice is due to decreased or obstructed flow of bile
through the liver or biliary duct system.
HEPATITIS
Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. Viral hepatitis is the most common cause of hepatitis.
The types of viral hepatitis are A, B, C, D, E, and G.
Hepatitis A
o HAV is an RNA virus that is transmitted through the fecal-oral route.
o The mode of transmission of HAV is mainly transmitted by ingestion of food or liquid
infected with the virus and rarely parenteral.
Hepatitis B
o HBV is a DNA virus that is transmitted perinatally by mothers infected with HBV;
percutaneously (e.g., IV drug use); or horizontally by mucosal exposure to infectious
blood, blood products, or other body fluids.
o HBV is a complex structure with three distinct antigens: the surface antigen (HBsAg), the
core antigen (HBcAg), and the e antigen (HBeAg).
o Approximately 6% of those infected when older than age 5 develop chronic HBV.
Hepatitis C
o HCV is an RNA virus that is primarily transmitted percutaneously.
o The most common mode of HCV transmission is the sharing of contaminated needles
and paraphernalia among IV drug users.
o There are 6 genotypes and more than 50 subtypes of HCV.
Hepatitis D, E, G
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o Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is an RNA virus that cannot survive on its own. It requires HBV to
replicate.
o Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an RNA virus that is transmitted by the fecal-oral route.
o Hepatitis G virus (HGV) is a sexually transmitted virus. HGV coexists with other viral
infections, including HBV, HCV, and HIV.
Clinical manifestations:
o Many patients with hepatitis have no symptoms.
o Symptoms of the acute phase include malaise, anorexia, fatigue, nausea, occasional
vomiting, and abdominal (right upper quadrant) discomfort. Physical examination may
reveal hepatomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and sometimes splenomegaly.
Many HBV infections and the majority of HCV infections result in chronic (lifelong) viral
infection.
Most patients with acute viral hepatitis recover completely with no complications.
Approximately 75% to 85% of patients who acquire HCV will go on to develop chronic infection.
Fulminant viral hepatitis results in severe impairment or necrosis of liver cells and potential liver
failure.
There is no specific treatment or therapy for acute viral hepatitis.
Drug therapy for chronic HBV and HBC is focused on decreasing the viral load, aspartate
aminotransferase (AST) and aspartate aminotransferase (ALT) levels, and the rate of disease
progression.
o Chronic HBV drugs include interferon, lamivudine (Epivir), adefovir (Hepsera), entecavir
(Baraclude), and telbivudine (Tyzeka).
o Treatment for HCV includes pegylated -interferon (Peg-Intron, Pegasys) given with
ribavirin (Rebetol, Copegus).
Both hepatitis A vaccine and immune globulin (IG) are used for prevention of hepatitis A.
Immunization with HBV vaccine is the most effective method of preventing HBV infection. For
postexposure prophylaxis, the vaccine and hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) are used.
Currently there is no vaccine to prevent HCV.
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Document Summary

Chapter 44: liver, pancreas, and biliary tract problems. Jaundice, a yellowish discoloration of body tissues, results from an alteration in normal bilirubin metabolism or flow of bile into the hepatic or biliary duct systems. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. Viral hepatitis is the most common cause of hepatitis. The types of viral hepatitis are a, b, c, d, e, and g. Hepatitis a: hav is an rna virus that is transmitted through the fecal-oral route, the mode of transmission of hav is mainly transmitted by ingestion of food or liquid infected with the virus and rarely parenteral. Hepatitis d, e, g: hepatitis d virus (hdv) is an rna virus that cannot survive on its own. It requires hbv to replicate: hepatitis e virus (hev) is an rna virus that is transmitted by the fecal-oral route, hepatitis g virus (hgv) is a sexually transmitted virus. Hgv coexists with other viral infections, including hbv, hcv, and hiv.

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