HLTB21H3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 3: Leprosy, Borderline Personality Disorder, Mycobacterium Leprae

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Published on 31 Oct 2010
School
UTSC
Department
Health Studies
Course
HLTB21H3
History
-The occurrence of leprosy has been recorded throughout history
-thought to be referred to in an Egyptian Papyrus document (1550 BC)
-In Indian writings, approximately 600 BC
-in the records of ancient Greece, after the army of Alexander the Great returned from India
(320 BC)
-In Rome (62 BC) with the return of Pompeii’s troops from Asia Minor
-Always been feared and misinterpreted
-Earlier thought to be a hereditary illness, or one that was caused by a curse or by punishment
by God
-Lepers were stigmatized and shunned from society
-E.g. In Europe - had to wear special clothing with a bell that would notify others of their
impending arrival
-Patients treated in separate hospitals and often had to live in colonies called leprosariums/
lazaretto/leper colony/lazar house
-First ‘leper house’ in England 936 AD
-Mid 12th Century - loss of civic status, removal from public office
-13th Century - 19,000 ‘leprosaria’ in use
-mass separation (set of rules, cannot enter church, cannot touch anything public...)
-disappearance 1350 AD
Dr. Armauer Hansen of Norway - 1873
-Discovers the leprosy germ under a microscope
-Mycobacterium leprae (M. Leprae)
-Not hereditary or caused by a curse. Leprosy is now called Hansen’s Disease
Etiology
-Chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium Leprae
-Slow multiplying bacillus with an average doubling time of 12 - 14 days
-Incubation period of 3-5 years
-Thought to be transmitted via droplets, from the nose during close and frequent contact
-Not highly infectious - may be related to genetic susceptibility
-Mainly affects the skin, nerves, and mucous membranes
Risk
-Leprosy can affect people of all races all around the world
-Most common in warm, wet areas in the tropics and subtropics
-Most common between the ages of 10 and 14 and those aged 35 - 44 years old
-Rarely seen in infants
Clinical Manifestations
-Indeterminate (IL)
-Tuberculoid (TT)
-Borderline tuberculoid (BT)
-Borderline lepromatous (BL)
-Lepromatous (LL)
Lecture 3 - Hansen!s Disease (Leprosy)
1
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Document Summary

The occurrence of leprosy has been recorded throughout history. Thought to be referred to in an egyptian papyrus document (1550 bc) In the records of ancient greece, after the army of alexander the great returned from india (320 bc) In rome (62 bc) with the return of pompeii"s troops from asia minor. Earlier thought to be a hereditary illness, or one that was caused by a curse or by punishment by god. Lepers were stigmatized and shunned from society. In europe - had to wear special clothing with a bell that would notify others of their impending arrival. Patients treated in separate hospitals and often had to live in colonies called leprosariums/ lazaretto/leper colony/lazar house. First leper house" in england 936 ad. Mid 12th century - loss of civic status, removal from public of ce. 13th century - 19,000 leprosaria" in use. Mass separation (set of rules, cannot enter church, cannot touch anything public)