LINA02H3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 8: North American English, Appalachian English, Phonological Word

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Published on 7 Jun 2011
School
UTSC
Department
Linguistics
Course
LINA02H3
Last week we looked at social factors that
apply to entire regional groups: isolation
and contact.
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While it is traditional for speech
communities to be identified regionally,
they can in fact be identified according to
different criteria. For example:
social networks
gender
class
age
ethnicity
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When these criteria are taken into
consideration, every regional community
can be seen as being heterogeneous,
consisting of multiple sub-varieties.
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Document Summary

Last week we looked at social factors that apply to entire regional groups: isolation and contact. www. notesolution. com, while it is traditional for speech communities to be identified regionally, they can in fact be identified according to different criteria. Both have the exact same set of alveolar consonant phonemes. www. notesolution. com. Phonological variation: in some dialects of american english there is a difference between the vowel in the word caught and the vowel in the word. In other dialects difference has been neutralized, i. e. lost. (gerfen 2002: this is phonemic variation: these dialects differ in terms of their underlying phonemic inventory. www. notesolution. com. Morphological variation: in northern england and southern wales, the -s suffix is used as a general present tense marker. In many other dialects of english, -s is reserved for marking the present tense in third person singular forms only. (gerfen 2002) We walks all the time: appalachian english has a number of past tense forms that are non-standard.