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Lecture 14

PSYA01H3 Lecture Notes - Lecture 14: Qualia, Intentionality, Behaviorism


Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYA01H3
Professor
Steve Joordens
Lecture
14

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What is Consciousness?
Consciousness can refer to:
The state of being awake and alert
Patients in coma are NOT conscious (doctors interested in this)
a.
Found there was a hint of words remembered under anesthesia
b.
1)
In general sense, being "aware" of something
Conscious of the food in front of you
a.
2)
In specific sense, the state of being aware of oneself, or at least one's own thoughts
To be self conscious or self-aware
a.
3)
When used as an adjective "conscious" thoughts or processes are typical linked to goals
and the notion of behavioral control
4)
Critiques:
Means a lot of things
Hard to study that term because means people can talk about different things
Behaviorism = don't talk about consciousness, only biological terms
Goals and habits can be in conflict
The Nature of Consciousness
Intentionality -> consciousness is directed toward something (always?)
Unity -> consciousness is very hard to divide, conscious of one thing at a time
Selectivity -> only certain aspects of stimuli are brought into consciousness
Transience -> difficult to keep consciousness from moving
The Challenges of Consciousness
Subjective phenomenology
Philosophers call this qualia (AKA the feelings)
Our consciousness is filled with these qualia/feelings
Relevant or epiphenomenal?
Things feel certain ways to us (eg. Pain, anger, sadness)
Lecture 14
Saturday, October 12, 2019
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