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Lecture 12

Personality Lecture 12 Notes

6 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYB30H3
Professor
Marc A Fournier

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Personality – Lecture 12
What are the stylistic/characteristic ways in which we adapt to our environment
Motivational adaptations
David Mclelland
One of the pioneers of social motivation
Motivation/need are interchangeable – according to Mclelland
Idea of an implicit motive
How motives are different from traits, and how they interact
Introduction to Social Motivation
A motive: a recurrent preference or readiness for a particular quality of experience, which
energizes, directs and selects behaviour in cetain situations
For Mclelland, motive was a lens – it's a way of filtering our experiences.
We each see the world differently according to different motivational preferences.
Motives are different from traits
Traits – Refer to “what behaviour, thought, or feeling does someone have.
Motivation – Refer to questions that begin with “why”. Why somebody has done what
they have done. Motive underlying the behaviour.
Difference between a motivation and a conscious intention
We are aware of some of our motives and intentions.
But there are certain motivations that are only partly accessible to consciousness
So much that motivates us we aren't aware of – so how do we measure this?
Measuring Implicit Motivation
Mclelland's strategy – Thematic Apperception Test (TAT)
he was the one who used it for this
participants write stories about the (ambiguous) pictures on cards.
We project our motivation, concerns, hopes, and fears onto the characters in the
story we're creating.
Projective test
www.notesolution.com
Achievement Motive
believed that this was an implicit motivation so only partly conscious of it.
We need the TAT to access this.
Scoring System
You need a scoring system to code the stories for themes related to
achievement
You need to experimentally create conditions (give them cognitive task and
make them believe it reflects their abilities) under which achievement
motivation is temporarily raised
Then identify themes that tend to appear and use this as a standard scoring
system
Several Criticisms against TAT
1) Poor reliability
if people write different stories, achievment may not come up all the time
relibaility puts a ceiling on validity
2) Poor criterion validity
3) Disagreement btwn questionnaires and TAT
measures of motivation derived, don't always agree with the questionnaire
results of the same motives
4) Participants feel pressure to write a completely different story when they see a
new card
unless they are told that they don't have to
SO, TAT is a long standing measure of implicit motivation, however it has been a
controversial instrument.
Mclelland & Achievement Motivation
N-Ach
Need for achievement: recurrent concern with doing things better
People with a need for achievement take things that work and make them work better
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Personality Lecture 12 What are the stylisticcharacteristic ways in which we adapt to our environment Motivational adaptations David Mclelland One of the pioneers of social motivation Motivationneed are interchangeable according to Mclelland Idea of an implicit motive How motives are different from traits, and how they interact Introduction to Social Motivation A motive: a recurrent preference or readiness for a particular quality of experience, which energizes, directs and selects behaviour in cetain situations For Mclelland, motive was a lens its a way of filtering our experiences. We each see the world differently according to different motivational preferences. Motives are different from traits Traits Refer to what behaviour, thought, or feeling does someone have. Motivation Refer to questions that begin with why. Why somebody has done what they have done. Motive underlying the behaviour. Difference between a motivation and a conscious intention We are aware of some of our motives and intentions. But there are certain motivations that are only partly accessible to consciousness So much that motivates us we arent aware of so how do we measure this? Measuring Implicit Motivation Mclellands strategy Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) he was the one who used it for this participants write stories about the (ambiguous) pictures on cards. We project our motivation, concerns, hopes, and fears onto the characters in the story were creating. Projective test www.notesolution.com
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