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Lecture

The Brain.docx

4 Pages
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Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYA01H3
Professor
Steve Joordens

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Description
PSYA01 Oct. 3/10 Cerebral Cortex  Where high level of perception of world of world occurs  Where controlled motor activities originate  Essentially, this is where all of our controlled interactions with the external world occur o Unlike other sections of the brain where responses are due to stimuli and monitoring/controlling internal functions. We can’t exactly replicate a machine that exactly replicates a brain. We can make machines that copy individual functions but nothing that will run exactly like the brain. Evolutionary Theory Folds were created because as the brain grew, it would become heavier. This would result in a problem with balance. The Cortex Primary cortex – direct sensory (or motor) connections Association – interpretation via memory (what have we seen, learnt) Left side of brain often receives information from and controls the right side of the brain. The vice versa is true for the right side of the brain. Contralateral: Relating to or denoting the side of the body opposite to that on which a particular structure or condition occurs. Occipital lobes (vision) Primary visual cortex is directly related to sight and damage to it produces a hole in the visual field (scitoma). The association context performs the function of providing an interface between visual input and memory, allowing one to categorize visual images. Agnosia: the inability to name common objects. People can still see but can no longer identify what they are seeing. This is caused by damage to the association context of the occipital lobe. PSYA01 Oct. 3/10 Temporal lobe (auditory) The primary cortex is mostly hidden from view, as it lies on the inside of the temporal lobe. Damage to this leads to hearing problems. The association cortex is located on the lateral surface of the upper temporal lobe.  Damage to left leads to severe language deficits o Patients losing the ability to comprehend or produce meaningful speech  Damage to right affects the person’s ability to properly perceive non-speech sounds like rhythm. Parietal Lobe Primary sensory function involves perception of the body. The association cortex seems to be involved in complex spatial functions that differ across the hemispheres.  Left parietal appears to keep track of the spatial location of our body parts – proprioception (the ability to sense the position and location and orientation and movement of the body and its parts.) o Damage to this is often associated with poor motor movement
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