Class Notes (836,580)
Canada (509,856)
Psychology (7,783)
PSYB65H3 (519)
Lecture

Lecture 1.docx

8 Pages
87 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYB65H3
Professor
Zachariah Campbell
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 1 : "Psychology has a long past, but only a short history" Hermann Ebbinghaus­ Psychology has a long past but only a short history.  the written record for the understanding of ourselves as individuals, as a society is limited  first written records ­ 8000 to 10000 years ago ( Blip on a radar ­ as a species)  we've been looking at eachother, asking us fundamental philosophical questions ( who am I ?, where did I come from?)  because our nervous system developed the capability to do so   humans adapted a capacity ( parallel to environment they've adapted to) to ask these questions  The History of Neuropsychology • Trephination (still done today ­  an evasive process necessary   Surgical procedure for long time survival)  Trephining: Cutting a circular hole in the skull on the side of the head  opposite the site of an injury as a means of therapeutic intervention to  relieve pressure from a swelling brain.   It was thought that the brain interpreted signals and that the mind was a  separate entity entirely.  understand ourselves in terms of biological basis of behaviour  Neolithic Trephination: young girl who lived within 3500 BC ( before  common era) with massive hole in her head → this girl survived because of  the evidence of callus tissue forming around the ridge of that hole   some show the healing formation → survival  some dont show the healing formation → death  MultipleTrephination: Multiple operations in skulls, try to understand  why number of people were experiencing epileptic seizure  Reasons for procedure: Medical or Magical? ­ why are we letting skulls heal again → must be due to medical or  Lecture 1 : "Psychology has a long past, but only a short history" • Modern Neurosurgery (used continuously depending  on severity of conditions)  Craniotomy: replace bone flap  Cranectomy: remove brain flap  same basic procedure ­ exposing brain   Depressed skull fracture : hit yourself with a hammer and  push bone into cavity of skull → you want to push the skull back out, so drill hole right beside the bone to relieve  depression and also to push the bone back out   ICP (intracranial pressure monitoring): after someone sustains dramatic brain injury ­ there is swelling in  the brain → relieve pressure physically : open up part of skull, let brain expand   Subdural Hemtoma: The bleeding fills the brain area very rapidly, compressing brain tissue. This often results in  brain injury and may lead to death.  Epidural Hematoma: Rupture of a blood vessel, usually an artery, which then bleeds into the space between the  "dura mater" and the skull. The affected vessels are often torn by skull fractures.  Deep brain stimulation (DBS). Neurosurgery in which electrodes are implanted in the brain; used in the  treatment of Parkinson patients to facilitate normal movement. • Biological Basis of Human Experience/ Behaviour (two themes that were born out of western civilization)   Cephalocentric: brain hypothesis ­> experience and what allows behaviour to manifest is within the brain itself   Alcmaeon of Croton, Hippocrates, Plato Alcmaeon: located mental processes in the brain and so subscribed to the brain hypothesis Hippocrates and Galen: proposed the “brain hypothesis” or “cephalocentric hypothesis” where the  brain is responsible for thought and sensation.   Cardiocentric: experience and what allows behaviour to manifest is within the heart  Empedocles of Acragas, Aristotole Empedocles: located mental processes in the heart and so subscribed to what Lecture 1 : "Psychology has a long past, but only a short history" could be called the cardiac hypothesis, heart was the source of behaviour. This hypothesis still has an effect on pop culture today, like how humans associate love with the heart and  not the brain. Aristotle: also came to the conclusion that the heart was the centre involved with through and sensation  because it is warm and active and that since heat rises, the brain was the blood cooling centre. • Western Civilization   It offered us philosophy ( how to think about logic, inductive reasoning) and natural sciences  • Ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman Thinkers   Theories that people have put forth is whatever they were exposed to at that point of time (based on their experiences).  Nature and Locus of mind. Advances in mathematics and philosophy. • Early Greek Medicine  before 500 BCE → medical issues were dealt by secret society of templar priests  through rituals you were healed  also, during that time ALCMAEON OF CROTON : in Greece, ancient physician who looked at human body and  looked at diseases using objective dissection of animals   established a medical school to get rid of these templar positions   holistic phenomenon ­ if someone's sick there is some sort of imbalance → environments too stressful, diet  isn't great ( how you fit in the universe) • Hippocrates (460­377 BCE)  Hippocratic Oath → first do no harm (not hurt but help)  founder of modern medicine  advocate for brain hypothesis (cephalocentric) → brain was seed of behaviour and experience  he based this on his own experience → people being hit in the head, physical injuries and realized if you hit someone  in the head their behaviour gets knocked out Lecture 1 : "Psychology has a long past, but only a short history"  he understood brain was contralaterally organized ( right side  of brain if injured will affect left side of the body)   Epilepsy (The sacred Disease): where he states that the brain is  the most powerful organ and all other senses act in accordance to that  ­ a non­genetic disorder involving spontaneous, unpredictable, and  recurring seizures that may be accompanied by convulsions. This  occurs when the neurons in the brain start firing all at once all over   brain hypothesis  the place instead of just doing their own thing on their own time.  disappears for a very long  time  Aristotle (384­ 322 BCE)­ Philosopher  understanding of Tabula rasa → we all start off as blank  slates  first person to ever understand the concept of mind  (PSYCHE=mind)   mind was a nonmaterial (not biological) entity → essence that can't be captured by any sense that we own; it is  responsible for human thought, perception, emotion  nonmaterial psyche was responsible for human thoughts,  perceptions, and emoti
More Less

Related notes for PSYB65H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit