Class Notes (836,147)
Canada (509,656)
Sociology (2,430)
SOCC03H3 (15)
Lecture

Lecture3_Sept26.docx

3 Pages
93 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCC03H3
Professor
John Hannigan
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 3 – Sept26 Today and next week we focus on rumors. - Urban legends, gossip, conspiracy theories - Next week: handout assignment - Acting crowd: protests, riots - It’s not every day that you participate in a riot or protest - Rumor: o simple o credibility in question but has elements of truth/believability o used to be passed on thru word of mouth but nowadays by internet o evolves as it gets passed on - rumors are embedded in our culture and language o e.g. rumor has it 1 rumor: Paul McCartney dead - article appeared in northern star (paper in northern Illinois uni) with title “hint about possible Beatle death” o paul mccartney dead and is now using a body double - Whether if people heard the rumor actually believe it is another story. Rumor did have a lot of entertainment value though. o Credibility was given by rumor going on paper and radio 2 rumor: 1981 – product rumor about company Procter and Gamble - Headquarters picked up phone calls from consumers alleging that the company had significant ties to Satan (mostly from Minnesota) - Mostly because of the logo - Rumor was that the owner appeared on a popular talk show that he had given 20% of the profit to the “Church of Satan” - Other rumors state that the owner had made deals with the Satan - Rumor spread from southern USA to other parts of the country - Ultimately, Procter and Gamble was forced to pull the logo off their products - The rumor started by Youth for Christ where religion had played a significant role. Jim Peters was the 2 source who is a Christian crusader against rock music (work of devil) and made claims about the logo. - 2 time the rumor spread, it was because of competing company. - “Rumor is an expression of a belief about a specific event that is supposed to have happened is about to happen” book pg4 - Certain types of rumors often focus on events that are about to happen (e.g. sports trades) o This is fascinating because sports fans look for confirming evidence that can prove the rumor true o In sports, most of the rumors do not actually happen - One of the themes in this book is that “how does globalization lead to rumors” o Maybe it’s because it’s too global, it’s harder to find confirmation and is a confusing world - The original research on rumors has not come out of collective behaviour but from social psych - Loose lips sink ships: in Britain and the US, government went to great efforts to convince people not tell secrets because people with accents might turn out to be spies - One of the things about war is that the government controls the info and to control the flow of info o When you have tightly controlled info, it leads to rumors because when people do not have access to info, they try to seek out info from unofficial channels - Basic law of rumor: if subject of particular story is important to the listener and the story
More Less

Related notes for SOCC03H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit