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SOCC25H3 (16)
Lecture

SOCC25 w10.docx

2 Pages
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Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCC25H3
Professor
Francisco Villegas

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SOCC25 How do you know if racism is racism?  Power relation and bodily symbol It is about intent or consequence, when identifying racism?  Causing spiritual injury  Specific examples of how scientific examples – those scientists are not trying to be scientists, but those individual scientists probably didn’t have intention to be scientists  What matters in this conversation o Racism isn’t about someone intending but how they feel  What the proof is, depending on which side we take o If it is about intent is the core focus, it is about someone meaning to cause injury o If it is about consequence, we take it according to the way it was experienced o We focused primarily on what are the consequence of the action o What are the histories of similar actions? Do they perpetuate along the history of the actions? The focus at the end of the day depends on who grieves than those who convey.  So who is considered to not have sense of humor? Who cannot laugh at a joke because of racism? Who is too sensitive? Who is always pointed out as a person using the racism card? What are the consequences of that? o People just want to fit in so they take it in o She unconsciously felt like she had to assimilate o Responsibility on the victim and they are the ones that need to fix the problem – the double-edge o Way to silence you into not being able to voice out what is racist action. Persuade you into tell you that there is no violence  Everyday racism o Chronology of events that show us in this particular moment and in time, what I just experienced is racism o By different ways I understood the society told us to respond to my body. Racism can include – low expectation (which body hold what ability and which do not), patronizing attitude when speaking about race.  Example: o The ways in which people read p
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