Class Notes (839,561)
Canada (511,396)
English (1,425)
ENG140Y1 (118)
Nick Mount (76)
Lecture

Eng140 Things Fall Apart Lecture

2 Pages
59 Views

Department
English
Course Code
ENG140Y1
Professor
Nick Mount

This preview shows 80% of the first page. Sign up to view the full 2 pages of the document.
Description
ENG140 ­ Lecture October 26th, 2012 THINGS FALL APART ­ why this book? ­ for many readers, this writer is the father of AFrican literature, and  this is the foundational work of what came to be called post­colonial literature ­  literature of former colonists, primarily colonies of European empires ­ what makes this book different from previous African literature is that it was the first  novel to offer a literary form of resistance ­ this author rewrote both the form and content of Western literature in order to provide  a different kind of imaginative space ­ for both African and non­African readers ­ in  which they can go on to imagine a different political space ­ changed the way we see our world ­ the kinds of possibilities that exist in our world ­ it is still relevant because right now, things still appear to be falling apart ­ for many  similar reasons ­ "'Things Fall Apart' is a novel about colonial power and a man w ho kills himself  because he can't live under it. It is therefore deeply a novel for our time." ­ Aine  McGlynn ­ "Things Fall Apart" is about a place and a people that is unknown to modern readers  but it still feels familiar ­ the novel is very foreign ­ we have probably never experienced these things and  probably never will ­ Okonkwo and his people are not just other, they are "THE other" ­ "no group ever sets itself up as the One without at once setting up the Other over  against itself" ­ Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex ­ p 184, Mr Smith saw things in black and white, and black was evil. ­ At the time when the novel was written, most readers only saw Africa out of  european's eyes, not out of an African's eyes ­ the novel is not so much about the plot but rather about his people's culture before  colonialism ­ "We in Africa did not hear of culture for the first time from Europeans" ­ most writing about Africa previous to this was done by white writers ­ "I wrote to help my society regain belief in itself" ­  main implied audience of this book is Europeans/an English reader ­ the book was first published in English ­ first published in London by a British publisher ­ p. 18 ­ the word chi is translated ­ it is lear that the narrator is helping people more like  us to understand the context of the novel and it is aimed at people like us ­ what is the importance of the epigraph? ­ the village 
More Less
Unlock Document

Only 80% of the first page are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit