Class Notes (836,135)
Canada (509,645)
English (1,425)
ENG140Y1 (118)
Nick Mount (76)
Lecture

Literature of our Time – The Wasteland.docx

4 Pages
100 Views
Unlock Document

Department
English
Course
ENG140Y1
Professor
Nick Mount
Semester
Spring

Description
Literature of our Time – The Wasteland, continuation (OCT. 5 , 2012)  • Wasteland: what does allusion do for wasteland? Main purpose to suggest the  lingering presence of old stories in modern cities. Stories that are in fragments, a  culture in ruins.  • Partly, or mostly, a lament for the loss of those stories. For Elliot, not the stories  but for the ability to bring people together.   • Trying to suggest the persistence of those old stories, that ophelius survives in the  pub.  • Lament or celebration? Allusions open up literary work, add richness, historical  dimension… “this story like another story • One of the functions, they’re a sort of test, if you feel something the way Prufrock  feels then you will understand what he is talking about. And then you will not be  able to communicate. If you understand ENOUGH of the allusions in the  wasteland, then you will share others despair. The allusions are crucial.  •  Last part, wrote in a kind of trance. Part 5: “the approach to the chapel of heras”,  the knight has been purified by fire, and water. He has to cross hostile lands  before reaching his destination. (Frodo + Sam to Mordor)  • The landscape becomes progressively more horrific (bats handing upside down  with baby faces – Dracula?)  • Men hear “data” (give), demons hear be compassionate. Gods hear control  yourselves. God gives the answer. At the chapel, the god speaks the word of  power. “die”. This is the answer. The word itself is the grail. Meaning that has  been missing from the world. The poem ends with three interpretations of this  word, in different languages.  • The fisher king is fishing again, so perhaps the knight was successful. Should he  put his lands in order? And yet, through the babel of the last stanza, the fisher king  hears the words “chanti…” means “peace/silence” the Buddhist nirvana. Peace  that passes understanding.   • The problem for readers, is that the peace that passes understanding passes  understanding. It cannot be paraphrased, it cannot be explained, it can only be  experienced. It is the peace that passes understanding. You can feel it, you can’t  explain it. That meaning is not accessible, or comprehensible to anyone but the  reader.   • Elliot chose faith. He was baptized in secrecy, in 1927.  • Windows of history create the time. He taught his generation how to see their  time. William Mensa? (said “I do not know for certain how much of my own  mind you invent”)  •  Elliot was wrong about popular culture, he could not understand that 95% of  everything is crap (haha).  • Different versions of the truth.  • Elliot also hoped and ultimately believed that there is some sort of meaning.  There’s a “shape”, an order.  • The loss of a shared culture (what Elliot is really lamenting)  • Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse • There is no plot (in the traditional sense). Like Picasso, Elliot, Woolf gave up the  deceit of plot. Stream of consciousness, a narrative technique. Tries to represent  and capture the way our minds try to perceive the world. A continuous flow of  thoughts. • The method of writing smooth narrative can’t be right. Things don’t happen in  one’s mind like that. We experience, all the time, an overlapping of images and  ideas, and modern novels should convey our mental confusion instead of neatly  arranging it. The reader must sort it out” –VW • (pg 92), the internal problems…  “why must they grow up and lose it all?”  • The character are constantly flitting back and forth. See the narrative as how it’s  seen. The narrative perspective is moving through the house.  To the kitchen,  living room, to town, to the attic… • The narrative perspective is like the wind being blown through the house.   • In a realistic novel we are presented with a illusion that the character
More Less

Related notes for ENG140Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit