Class Notes (839,094)
Canada (511,185)
English (1,425)
ENG140Y1 (118)
Nick Mount (76)
Lecture

Lucky Jimbo.docx

4 Pages
98 Views

Department
English
Course Code
ENG140Y1
Professor
Nick Mount

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 4 pages of the document.
Description
1 Padideh Hassanpour 10/31/2012 Ethics and Creative Imagination Professor Kingwell “What a pity it was, he thought, that she wasn’t better­looking” I was quite convinced at the beginning of the book that Dixon was a callous,  indifferent, fellow suitable for disliking, and very similar to Marlowe (the latter proving  true). Since I hated Marlowe, finding him too snarky, lonely, and emotionless, I didn’t  want to fall into that same pattern with Dixon. Luckily, Dixon didn’t prove to be that  shabby, although I would never befriend a guy like him in reality, for fear of being  severely judged. I found Dixon too ungraceful and dull, as if everything was being  enforced upon him, from his job to his love life. He’s not fond of his academic  obligations, he often has violent thoughts towards his peers and superiors, and generally  lacks ambition. The only real feeling that seems to jolt him to life is Christine Callaghan,  whose main virtue is beauty (more on that shortly).  The trend in these past couple of books has been made evident by Dixon’s  character. Like Marlowe, Dixon enjoys an unhealthy amount of cigarettes and alcohol  and “rubs everyone the wrong way”, as mentioned in class. The similarity between their  attitudes is apparent in their unpleasantness, and enjoyment from making others feel  uncomfortable and angry. The likeness between Dixon and Ducane is apparent too, in  both their mediocre (or less than mediocre) performance as work. Ducane handed in a  thin report on Radeechy’s death, and Dixon manages to end up drunk at one of his  lectures, which results in a sacking. Both men end up leaving their stations. But more  interestingly of all comparisons is the similarly between Lily Bart and James Dixon. Lily  understands how her beauty is a means of attracting and obtaining power, though her  misfortune turns her beauty to vice. Dixon on the other hand is easily captivated by  beauty and understands its dangers and virtues. For both parties, beauty is a path towards  goodness and truth, and is a route to becoming virtuous.  Beauty unluckily happens to be  Lily’s downfall, but luckily for Dixon, obtaining beauty is the pinnacle of his career. By  2 winning beauty, Dixon becomes a better person (or is under the illusion he can be), and is  therefore capable of greater kindness, humility, and honesty.  When Dixon first notices Christine Callaghan, he associates her beauty with good  health. “She grinned, which made her look almost ludicrously healthy” (71). Her physical  beauty is so close to perfection that it renders Dixon to anger. He internalizes his anger,  remarking how she arouses “indignation, fried, resentment, peevishness, spite, and sterile  anger, all the allotropes of pain” within him (72). Her beauty is envious, and unattainable,  which makes her more desirable, leaving Dixon helpless to its charm. What’s interesting  is the power beauty has over him, surrendering him to a primitive animal drive. It’s as if  sleeping with Christine will satisfy his being, perhaps complete him and make him a just  person. But why is beauty so captivating, not only for Dixon, but for the human  population?  Beauty is a phenomenon I wish to understand. I want to know more about  aesthetics so as to understand why the relation between attractiveness and goodness is  present within society. Maybe this way I can make sense of the absurdity that is  perpetuated through mainstream media. But based on my limited knowledge of beauty, I  understand it to be linked to mating and evolution. Biologically speaking, although there  is no ultimate ideal for facial perfection, desirable physical straights are linked to  averageness, symmetry, skin condition, eye colour, and the fullness of lips. These traits  are linked to fertility, a
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit