Class Notes (922,930)
CA (543,002)
UTSG (45,883)
FOR (108)
FOR303H1 (6)
K A N T (6)
Lecture

Lecture 4: Forest Values & Ranking Forest Projects

3 Pages
86 Views

Department
Forestry
Course Code
FOR303H1
Professor
K A N T

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Lecture 4: Forest Values & Ranking Forest Projects
Forest Values &/ Forest Ethics
·two approaches
oinstrumental approaches-humans are the basis of moral agency, forests have value if they
provide things we value, this dominates Euro-American (EA) thought
onon-anthropocentric-humanity not the root of moral agency, forests have a value in itself,
forests have values for humans as well as other living beings, forests have value for the
existence of life on earth
·utilitarianism: accord. to Jeremy Benthan, maximize the greatest good for the greatest number
obut questions raised:
§but aren't somethings right/wrong regardless of the consequences
§ how to quantify happiness
§ how to consider everyone's happiness
§but most ppl live far from forests, & get more pleasure from the products which
come from the forest than the forest itself
ounofficial basis for all EA public policy
·deontology: the ethics of duty & rights
obegan with Kant, focus of ethics are principles upon which we act, not the consequences
owe are ethical when we are rational, & we are rational when our principles are universal
& ultimate
oimplies a set of duties adhering to all rational beings (ppl)
§forests can't be rational, so they have no rights, but ppl do have rights & may
have a right to forests existing in a certain state
·but only ppl are rational, so only ppl matter
·what 'bout ppl who aren't rational
othis is the basis of modern democracy & human rights
·property rights
otwo streams:
§liberal (Jeffersonian): need to own land to be free (both from other ppl & the
gov't)
§Lockian:
·ppl own themselves & their labour
·land, in it's "natural" state, is unowned
oforests have value if they are owned, & to be owned must have some sort of human
development taking place
§but biased to management (ex. agri., forestry)
§but assumes availability of ample land
owhen nuanced with the "bundle-of-sticks" approach to property, it forms an important
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Lecture 4: Forest Values & Ranking Forest Projects Forest Values & Forest Ethics two approaches o instrumental approaches-humans are the basis of moral agency, forests have value if they provide things we value, this dominates Euro-American (EA) thought o non-anthropocentric-humanity not the root of moral agency, forests have a value in itself, forests have values for humans as well as other living beings, forests have value for the existence of life on earth utilitarianism: accord. to Jeremy Benthan, maximize the greatest good for the greatest number o but questions raised: but arent somethings rightwrong regardless of the consequences how to quantify happiness how to consider everyones happiness but most ppl live far from forests, & get more pleasure from the products which come from the forest than the forest itself o unofficial basis for all EA public policy deontology: the ethics of duty & rights o began with Kant, focus of ethics are principles upon which we act, not the consequences o we are ethical when we are rational, & we are rational
More Less
Unlock Document


Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit