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Lecture 19

Lecture 19: Multicultural Policy and it's Critics


Department
History
Course Code
HIS312H1
Professor
Ian Radforth
Lecture
19

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Lecture 19: Multicultural Policy and it's Critics
-a transition: from assimilation to living with difference
-deep roots
-pluralism
-John Murray Gibbon, "The Canadian Mosaic" (1938)
-International Institute of Metropolitan Toronto
-gov't policies
-WWII: Nationalities Branch, 1941
-post-war reconstruction: Citizenship Division of the Secretary of State, 1944
*final on Wed. Dec. 15 at 2 pm(-4pm)
-2 hr exam
-choose 2 q's out of 6
-cumulative
-lectures, readings, tutorials
-look at past exams
-compare/contrast
-make sure to say how A is similar to B, how B is different from A, show
how they are connected
-major changes in the post-war period for immigration
-most significant was shift away from "white Canada" to a colourblind policy based on
skills and family ties
-and so Canada became much more diverse
-1971, multicultural policy adopted by the fed. gov't
-very important symbolic moment with important repercussions
-previous Canadian policy aimed at assimilating foreigners mostly into a Brit/Fre-
based Canadian culture
-encourage the abandonment of foreign cultures
-seen to be inferior or divisive
-now officially celebrates cultural differences
-encouraged respect for cultural differences
-that all cultures can flourish
-Canadian identity seen as multicultural
-1969-onwards (???), refugee policy
-multicultural roots in Canada
-committed to pluralism
-encouraged tolerance to different cultures
-celebrated differences in the first half of the 20th c.
-ppl working in settlement houses
-ppl encouraged to settle and share
-also encouraged "Canadianization"
-Canadian mosaic
-coined in the 1930s
-proponent, John Murray Gibbon
-International Institute of Metropolitan Toronto, 1950s
-dealt with newcomers to Canada
-encouraged ethnic groups to respect one another, and be pride
-but to also know Canadian ways
-gov't policy precedence
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