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CA (542,723)
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HIS263Y1 (268)
Lecture

factories, farms and bunkhouses

3 Pages
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Department
History
Course Code
HIS263Y1
Professor
Mc Kim/ Penfold

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Farms, factories, bunkhouses
I. Immigrants and Canada during the Boom Years
Despite Oliver’s desire to keep out what he would deem as ‘not ideal citizens
come to Canada anyways because they are needed. Whatever the government says
in terms of cultural desires in Canadians undermines the economic needs of
Canada.
II. Economic Boom
Largely tied to global conditions – international events
Expanding economy requires workers an farmers, partly from immigration
In a broader sense, there is a strong tendency to equate population growth to
national prosperity
Immigrants were seen as potential producers, but also as potential consumers.
The farming frontier (wheat)
Wheat = economic development
1901: all of Canada produced about 56 million bushels of wheat. By 1911 just the
prairies produce 208 million (approx. 4 time increase in just the prairies alone)
Canada becomes one of the world’s key wheat producers
Wheat becomes a key thing to bind the country together (east-west) in a
transnational economic sense
To produce wheat tools are need (also produced in Canada)
The industrial frontier (transportation, resources)
Wage labour rather then commodity production
Transportation: tremendous railway development. Moreover, many branches
develop off the main lines.
III. Urban Development
IV. Ethnic Webs and Contact Zones
The Age of Light, Soap, and Water
I. The Age of Reform
Ida Whipple: In 1910 she was a 17-year-old living in St. John New Brunswick.
She wrote an essay, which gained her a prize for her work titledthe Busy Easy”
concerning civic improvement. She took under this subject a wide range of issues:
she called for a better public library, playgrounds, policing, chemistry equipment
at local high school, and liquor prohibition.
This very ordinariness makes her and her essay a very good example of the trends
that will be discussed
Represented the broader trends of the period, and how deeply these progressive
ideas penetrated into the populace. It not only concerned political figures, but also
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Description
Farms, factories, bunkhouses I. Immigrants and Canada during the Boom Years Despite Olivers desire to keep out what he would deem as not ideal citizens come to Canada anyways because they are needed. Whatever the government says in terms of cultural desires in Canadians undermines the economic needs of Canada. II. Economic Boom Largely tied to global conditions international events Expanding economy requires workers an farmers, partly from immigration In a broader sense, there is a strong tendency to equate population growth to national prosperity Immigrants were seen as potential producers, but also as potential consumers. The farming frontier (wheat) Wheat = economic development 1901: all of Canada produced about 56 million bushels of wheat. By 1911 just the prairies produce 208 million (approx. 4 time increase in just the prairies alone) Canada becomes one of the worlds key wheat producers Wheat becomes a key thing to bind the country together (east-west) in a transnational economic sense To produce wh
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