Class Notes (836,518)
Canada (509,851)
HMB200H1 (140)
Lecture 13

HMB200 2014 Lecture 13.pdf
Premium

4 Pages
96 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Human Biology
Course
HMB200H1
Professor
John Yeomans
Semester
Winter

Description
  Lecture  13:  Feeding  and  Obesity     Recall:  Huge  investment  needed  by  warm  blooded  animals  to  keep  body  temperature  at  a  certain  level   -­‐  requires  huge   amounts  of  energy   -­‐ birds  and  mammals  have  large  brains  because  its  used  more  effectively  by  having  them  function  at  a  high  and   stable  temperature  the  whole  lifetime   -­‐ only  way  to  do  this?  Invest  in  a  huge  amount  of  resources  to  maintain  this   Energy  sources   • Carbohydrates  (from  GI  tract)   à  converted  to  glucose   • Protein  à  Amino  acids  (builds  proteins  and  enzymes)   à  burning  of  amino  acids  also  give  lots  of  energy   • Fat  à  Fatty  acids   o The  most  important  and  most  abundant  energy  source  is  from  fats  cells  (80-­‐90%  of  total)   o Can  be  also  used  for  myelin  and  insulation     o Most  energy  from  burning  fat   • Other  ways  of  storing  energy:   o Fat  cells    -­‐  Most  efficient  at  storing  energy  than  any  other  energy  source  (more  energy  storage  per  unit   mass)   o Muscle  and  liver  glycogen  ( animal  starch)  -­‐  glucose  can  be  accumulated  in  long  chains  of  sugars,  which   then  gets  converted  into  starch.  Stored  in  muscle  tissue  (done  by  pancreatic  hormones)  and  liver  (stores   many  types  of  fuels  that  can  be  converted  into  energy  later )   o Glucose  is  the  only  source  of  energy  for  the  brain   o Ketones  -­‐  the  most  important  source  of  energy  for   the  brain  is  glucose    (immediate  source  of  energy).  If   there  is  low  blood  glucose,  ketones  are  used  as  an  energy  source  for  the  brain     Insulin  and  glucagon   • Blood  glucose  is  tightly  regulated  by   pancreatic  hormones  (insulin  and  glucagon)  made  by  beta  and  al pha  cells  of   Islet  of  Langerhans   o Beta  cells  -­‐  insulin;  alpha  cells  –  glucagon   • High  blood  glucose  activates  insulin;  low  blood  glucose  activates  glucagon   • Blood  glucose  goes  up  à  surge  in  insulin  (first  surge:  when  we  see  the  food;  second  surge:  when  we  eat   the  food)  -­‐   convert  glucose  into  storage  (transport  glucose  into  body  cells ,  never  to  brain)   • Blood  glucose  goes  down,  still  need  energy   à  glucagon  released  (alpha  cells),  converts  glycogen  from  storage  and   changes  it  into  glucose   • Keeps  blood  glucose  very   stable  and  is  important  because  the  main  energy  source  for  the  brain  in  glucose     Brain  energy   • Uses  glucose  and  O2  only  (and  ketones  in  starvation  situations)   • Burning  of  glucose  AND  oxygen  produces  the  energy  supply  of  the   brain  (need  oxygen  to  burn  glucose )   • Does  not  need  insulin  to  get  glucose,  so  it  always  gets  glucose  -­‐   keeps  function     going  all  the  time   • Brain  uses  over  20%  of  glucose  and  O2   • Special  access  to  glucose  -­‐  gets  it  even  when  other  body  parts  are   starving   • Fainting  helps  brain  get  these  when  blo od  pressure  drops   • Insulin  cannot  get  into  the  brain  either  because  of  the  blood  brain   barrier   • Diabetes  does  not  affect  the  brain  because  the  brain  did  not  have   insulin  in  the  first  place         Hypothalamus  and  feeding   Critical  areas/feeding  centers:  Lateral  hypothalamus   (LH),  Paraventriclar  nucleus  (PVN)  and  Ventromedial   hypothalamus  (VMH)     • LH  and  PVN  lesions  à  less  eating   • LH  and  PVN  stimulation  à  more  eating   • VMH  and  arcuate  lesion   à  more  eating   • VMH  stimulation  à  aversion,  cranky,  stop   eating  when  stimulated   • Therefore:  LH  and  PVN  for  feeding,  VMH  for   satiety   • PVN  gets  inputs  from  Neuopeptide  Y  and  N E,   which  increases  feeding;  5HT  decreases  feeding       ob/ob  and  db/db  mice   • Both  of  these  recessive  mutations  occur  on  single  genes   • ob/ob  =  obesity  mice;  db/db  =  diabetes     à  similar  symptoms  (obese,  and  eat  fats  as  if  starving)   • ob/ob  and  db/db  mice  are  obese,  and  eat  fats  as  if  starving.   • ob/ob  mice  have  mutation  in  leptin  gene.   • Leptin  is  peptide  produced  in  fat  cells  in  proportion  to  size.   • db/db  mice  have  mutation  in  leptin  receptor  gene.     • Leptin  receptors  in  arcuate  n.  and  LH.  Some  on  dopamine  neurons  too   • Leptin  is  a  peptide  produced  in  fat  cells  in  proportion  to   the  amount  of  fat  in  those  cells  (tell  the  brain  that   there’s  enough);  long  term  fat  storage  controlled  by  leptin  signal   • ob/ob:  mutation  in  leptin  gene  -­‐    fat  cells  cannot  produce  enough  leptin  to  tell  the  brain  that  the  fat  cells  are  doing   fine  –  brain  thinks  that  animal  is  starving   • db/db  is  mutation  in  leptin  receptor  gene  in  hypothalamus  that  codes  for  leptin  receptors  –  leptin  receptors  in   arcuate  n.  and  LH  (lateral  hypothalamus).     • Note:  ob/ob  symptoms  can  be  stopped  if  you  inject  leptin,  but  db/db  cannot  be  treated  this  way  (no  receptor)   • In  humans:  People  with  high  bbody  weight  also  have  lots  of  leptin  and  leptin  receptors   –  it  is  believed  that   hypothalamitc  setpoint  has  changed  (i.e.  leptin  insensitivity);  it  could  be  somewhere  between  the  arculate  n.  and   major  feeding  areas,  but  scient ists  are  unsure   • Seritonin  agonists  seem  to  work  for  humans;  large  peptides  do  not  because  it  cannot  cross  the  blood  brain  barrier     Starvation  Protection  Mechanism   • Loss  of  fat  à  less  leptin  getting  to  brainà  hunger   • Hypothalamus  thinks  you  are  starving  and  shuts  down  body  functions  à  energy  expenditure  and  temperature  go   down,  rep
More Less

Related notes for HMB200H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit