Class Notes (837,698)
Canada (510,399)
Psychology (3,528)
PSY328H1 (73)
Lecture 3

Lecture 3-Domestic Abuse.docx

5 Pages
83 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY328H1
Professor
Dax Urbszat
Semester
Winter

Description
Thursday, January 23, 2014 Lecture 3 – Domestic Abuse Domestic Abuse (Jones, 1994a) • Leading cause of injury in American women sending more than 1 million for  medical treatment every year • Spousal violence contributes to one fourth of all suicide attempts by women • 37% of all obstetric patients are battered during pregnancy • 50% of homeless women and children are fleeing from male violence Domestic Abuse • FBI reports that over 1400 women are killed by their partners each year (6% of  homicides) • Lenore Walker (1992) – over one third of all women will be abused at some point  in their lives • 16% of American families experience violence, 3­4% experience life threatening  violence • Each year 188,000 women are injured severely enough to require serious medical  attention (Straus & Gelles, 1988) Domestic Abusers Typology • Psychopathic abuser (violent/anti­social) • Overcontrolled exploder (family only) • Emotionally volatile (dysphoric/borderline  Sociopathic, Anti­Social, Typical Domestic Abusers Typology 1. Severity  2. Frequency  3. Psychopathology 4. Criminal history • Low, medium, and high risk batterers Victimology • No consistent typology for victims • Despite myths to the contrary domestic abuse victims cover all ethnicities, all  levels of society, and all personality types Syndrome • Is not a medical term; not a disease   • A group of symptoms that occur together and characterize a disease • Battered Woman Syndrome: a woman’s presumed reactions to a pattern of  continual physical and psychological abuse inflicted on her by her mate • BWS is not a diagnosable Mental Disorder • Needs to be brought up and asked to the judge before it is even brought up in a  case Battered Women Syndrome • American Psychiatric Association has recognized the syndrome in amicus briefs  filed as evidence in homicide cases with self­defense pleas. o Amicus briefs – when an outside party wants to put information into a  case they are not involved in  • BWS is a justification to certain crimes like homicide that is used to support  defenses of self­defense or insanity • Has been used to support children who kill abusive parents, same sex partner  homicides, rape victims who kill attackers, coercion to participate as co­defendant  in a serious crime o Rape victims – will have the feelings of fear forever  Components of Battered Woman Syndrome 1. Learned Helplessness 2. Lowered self­esteem 3. Impaired functioning 4. Loss of assumption of safety 5. Fear and terror 6. Anger/rage 7. Diminished alternatives 8. Cycle of abuse 9. Hypervigilance 10. High tolerance for cognitive inconsistency • I love him, he hates me • I’d rather kill the kids than let you take them  Learned Helplessness • Seligman & Johnston (1973) o Dogs shocked in harness and placed in shuttlebox, 60% could not avoid  shock • Hiroto & Seligman (1975) o 3 groups exposed to loud noise o Group 1 could find a button to stop noise o Group 2 nothing would stop noise  Gave up; stopped trying o Group 3 asked to “please sit and listen”  If you ask people to voluntarily sit and listen, they will not be  bothered by the noise • Fleas – first day will continue to jump and hit the lid; second day will only jump  as high as a little below the lid  Cognitive Qualifiers of Learned Helplessness • Inescapable aversive events inhibit learning • Loss of sense of control – behavior has no effect on environment – this  generalizes to multiple situations 1. Global vs. Specific view of negative situations 2. External vs. Internal locus of control 3. Stable vs. Transitory view of life conditions  Learned Helplessness • Lose motivation to try to control events in environment or give up easily • Cognitively, ability to learn from experience is impaired • Emotional problems: • Rats (ulcers), cats (ate less), dogs, (critically impaired task learning), monkeys  (illness) humans (high blood pressure, depression) Cycle of Abuse 1. Tension building phase 2. Acute battering incident 3. Contrition phase • Positive and negative reinforcement powerfully affect behavior • Not all battering relationships follow this cycle (60­70%) Forensic Assessment of BWS • Self­reports, medical records, interv
More Less

Related notes for PSY328H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit