Class Notes (834,986)
Canada (508,846)
Philosophy (52)
PHIL 337 (2)
Lecture

Utilitarianism.docx

13 Pages
79 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 337
Professor
Scott Woodcock
Semester
Winter

Description
Intro to Consequentialism Jessie Leonard • Teleological theories – the outcome is all that is important in determining the rightness or wrongness of  a decision • One type is Egoism (and from that comes contractarianism) • Most important form is Consequentialism • Impartiality is presumed (everyone gets an equal vote when looking at what decision will yield  the best results • Most people can agree that some things are good and some things are bad • Ex) Everyone thinks that money is good, but it is good to get something else • What divides theories is what you decide is intrinsically good (good for its own sake) • One view: knowledge, beauty and happiness (knowledge and beauty are important even if they  do not contribute to happiness with this view) Another: Utilitarianism – greatest good for the greatest number & happiness is the only thing  • that matters o This view has nothing against beauty and knowledge, but the only reason they are  important is because ultimately they contribute to happiness – instrumentally valuable o They are no longer good if they stop contributing to happiness • There is differences within Utilitarianism about how to determine happiness • Griffin calls it well­being and he takes about desire satisfaction • Tries to capture what it is that makes life better Utility/Well­being ­ Griffin Jessie Leonard • How do we even get a grip on what it is good for people? What counts as good for each person? • Utility/Well­being (Griffin) • Has two different sides: 1. Mental State  Defines happiness as some kind of mental state  Complication – what kind of psychological state are we looking at?  Single state of consciousness? One state that always comes up when  something pleasurable occurs  This seems counter intuitive because one is capable of many states of  consciousness at one time – how can those many different mental  states be quantified to show how pleasurable an experience is? There  seems to be different mental states that show pleasure   Freud’s death bed experience (I don’t want the drug, I prefer clear  thinking with pain then to not be able to think clearly) – relief from pain  is good but thinking clearly is a different kind of good  Complication ­ Sidgwick’s compromise  Allows for many different mental states to account for pleasure – has  to find some way to unify them  He decides to describe them all as desirable states of consciousness  (best case scenario for this kind of view, but there is still a problem)  The Experience Machine – plug into a machine that stimulates the  brain and you feel what is pleasurable to you, but you are basically a  lump floating in a tank.  Would you sign up for this?  Griffin said no, there is no bodily “experience”  Griffin makes a mistake when talking about this – it is not a matter of  control/free will 2. Desire Satisfaction/Fulfillment – Griffin’s argument is a move in this direction  Actual desires?  This has problems – economists like to measure how well people’s  lives are going through purchases – this isn’t plausible because we  make mistakes about what we want all the time ~pg.13  Informed desires (Best candidate to determine what makes a person’s life go  better)  He uses the example of acquired taste (caviar or scotch) There are problems with measuring desires – strength – it is not   obvious that felt quality is going to help us – not motivational Utility/Well­being ­ Griffin Jessie Leonard • Intensity of feelings of pleasure – having your life saved will  make you feel more pleasure than other things, but it doesn’t  make sense to live a rollercoaster life of having many near  death experiences  Different kind of desires: local, higher order, global, etc – take them all  into account into an ordering – doesn’t say how that is going to work  just that it isn’t to do with strength ordering  Problem – dropped the experience requirement • Stranger on the train cases – really want him to succeed even  though you never see him again. That person succeeds –  what has happened to your well­being? Under this view your  well­being has increased even though you are unaware that  he has succeeded. The Principle of Utility – Mill (Chp.2) Jessie Leonard • Everything comes down to consequences and utilitarianism is the best answer to this. • Some utilitarians distinguish pleasure and happiness • Mill doesn’t make that distinction and defines happiness as the presence of pleasure • Objection: Doctrine of swine – this ethical theory isn’t fit for humans, it doesn’t seem to fit the  complexities of being human • Seems to say that there is something degrading about utilitarianism • The critic that voices the opinion is assuming a degrading picture of human nature • Reply: This view presumes that humans are not capable of any pleasures greater than a pig –  human pleasures are complex o There can be qualitative differences in pleasure, it is not the case that pleasure is all of  the same sort (quality vs. quantity of pleasure) Objection: How do you specify different kinds of pleasure? • • Reply: Appeal to someone who has experienced all of the pleasures. By observation of what  people tend to like, that can be the deciding factor that categorizes the higher pleasures from  the lower ones.  o Ask a competent judge – all he means by competent is someone who has experienced  both the pleasures in question. o You cannot use the text to make fine grade decisions (what kind of chocolate is the  best kind of chocolate) o You need a massive number of people choosing one pleasure over the other –  everyone or almost everyone would choose one pleasure over another. • Most people would prefer the low quantity but high quality of pleasure versus the opposite (belief of  Mill). • Objection: Humans often pick simple pleasures • Reply: Yes, but they recognize their choice for what it is – they know it is less valuable ­ often  this choice is out of convenience. Lots of people aren’t given the opportunity to experience the higher pleasure so they get addicted to  lower pleasures (because of convenience) and they kill off their ability to appreciate the higher  pleasures ( No longer competent judges)  The Utility Principle – Mill con’t (Chp. 2&4) Jessie Leonard • If they really know what they are choosing and they are competent judges Mill argues that they aren’t  lower pleasures. • Youth are malleable and they can be taught and exposed to things so that they can become competent  judges. • In principle you have to come into in letting the test run it’s course and not go into it in a question  begging mind frame.  • There is no pre­existing standard that allows for some pleasures to be better than others. • Noble Character • Some kind of nobility that relates to humans • Relates to Virtue and Sacrifice below • Objection: Happiness Unattainable? You can’t just have super happy experiences all the time – that isn’t a fair objection because by  • happiness he means both pleasure and the absence of pain and so there is a balance between  tranquility and excitement • Really happiness is a balance • Important to fight for everyone to have access to this • Objection: Virtue and Sacrifice • Martyr • Doing something ethical that diminishes ones pleasure – it is increa
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 337

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit