Class Notes (834,818)
Canada (508,737)
Biology (6,794)
Lecture 3

Lecture 3.docx

6 Pages
87 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
Biology 2382B
Professor
Robert Cumming
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 3: Isolation and Analysis of Cell Organelles and Molecules Vinny  Aggarwal Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) Generally, antibodies cannot penetrate membranes in living cells, and so we must kill the cells in the  fixation process to allow the antibodies to penetrate inside the cell Some proteins, however, are located outside the cell (e.g. on the extracellular surface) and so the cell does  not need to be killed to detect these proteins via fluorescently­labeled antibodies Additionally, some dyes are membrane permeable and can be used to label intracellular structures without  killing the cell E.g. Hoescht stain can penetrate into the nucleus and bind to DNA Cells that have been fluorescently­labeled or taken up dye can be counted and quantified using as FACS  machine Cells are individually funneled through a passage where they are excited with a beam of light Both the emitted and scattered light are measured by detectors Counts both the number of cells that fluoresce each color, and the intensity of fluorescence If a fluorescing cell is detected, it can be labeled with a charge as it passes through a nozzle Different charges can be applied to different coloured cells When cells fall off the nozzle, they can be sorted based on charge by passing them through an electric field Different charges will interact differently with the field and land in different places Specific cell types can be quantified using a FACS machine E.g. Two surface proteins known to reside on T­cells are being tracked Thy1.2 is being tracked using a green fluorescing antibody, and CDC3 is being tracked using a red  fluorescing antibody As the cells pass through the FACS machine, the intensity of green and red fluorescence emitted by each  cell is recorded The cells with high intensity of both red and green fluorescence are the T­cells Some non­T­cells may contain either Thy1.2 or CDC3, but only T­cells will contain both Can calculate the number of proportion of cells from the desired population Cell cycle analysis can also be performed be FACS Nuclear DNA is labeled with Hoescht stain (membrane permeable) The intensity of the stain is indicative of the amount of nuclear DNA present Cells that have replicated their DNA, but not yet divided (G2 phase) will have twice the amount of  fluorescent intensity of cells in the G1 phase; cells in between are in the process of replicating their DNA (S  phase)  Number of cells in each phase indicates the length of the phase; i.e. most cells are in the G1 phase  because it is the longest phase Studying Intracellular Organelles and Their Proteins First step is to disrupt and break apart the cell plasma membrane, which can be done through a variety of  techniques Mechanical homogenization ­ essentially breaking the cells by using a pestle and mortar type apparatus Sonication – using ultrasound waves Pressure – cells are forced through a narrow valve that is smaller than the cell itself Non­ionic detergents – e.g. Triton X­100 Placing cells in a hypotonic solution – cells will absorb lots of water and eventually pop Second step is to centrifuge the cell homogenate Two methods: differential centrifugation or equilibrium density­gradient Centrifuges have a few critical components Samples are loaded onto the rotor It is critical to ensure that when loading the rotor, is it proper
More Less

Related notes for Biology 2382B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit