Geography 2011A/B Lecture 3: Lecture 3
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Department
Geography
Course Code
Geography 2011A/B
Professor
Wendy Dickinson

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Lecture 3 Economic Geography
Levels of Economic Activity
1. Primary: Extraction of raw materials, drove Canada from get-go
2. Secondary: Conversion of raw materials/adding value to
3. Tertiary: Services
4. Quaternary: Collection/processing/distributing information
Agriculture
- Reason for growth from immigration
- Ability to produce all WE needed, so used waterways to export
- Ontario leads Canada in $ value of farm products, holding ¼ of all farms = 9 millions
acres
- Risk of economic disaster = bugs eating, weather, legalities
- Subsidized by government (land rich, money poor)
- Environmental change threatens
- Only 5% of Canada is farmland, but from that we produced $10.3 billion in 2005
- Dairy products earn most, followed by fruit/vegetables/potatoes
- Land clearing effects runoff (Walkerton)
Commercial Fisheries
- Began around 1820
- Expanded 20% per year
- Best was in 1889 and 1899, over by 1950s
- Provinces set annual limits and licenses
- Around 80% of value is in Lake Erie, therefore no fishing is allowed on the Southern
(American) side
- Don’t really do this anymore
Forestry
- 1830 commercial logging began
- Paper making slowly began, now we are world leaders
- Pollution from production and loss of resources is a problem
- 80% of Ontario is forested = 85 billion trees
- Most towns have at least one forest-related industry
- 80% of forests are owned by the province, 9% is parks
- Volatile industry (but not as bad as people think)
- $14 billion in 2008, mostly in pulp and paper
- Around 200,000 direct and indirect jobs
- 40 of 260 forestry communities say they are highly dependent of the industry
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Description
Lecture 3 Economic Geography Levels of Economic Activity 1. Primary: Extraction of raw materials, drove Canada from getgo 2. Secondary: Conversion of raw materialsadding value to 3. Tertiary: Services 4. Quaternary: Collectionprocessingdistributing information Agriculture Reason for growth from immigration Ability to produce all WE needed, so used waterways to export Ontario leads Canada in value of farm products, holding of all farms = 9 millions acres Risk of economic disaster = bugs eating, weather, legalities Subsidized by government (land rich, money poor) Environmental change threatens Only 5 of Canada is farmland, but from that we produced 10.3 billion in 2005 Dairy products earn most, followed by fruitvegetablespotatoes Land clearing effects runoff (Walkerton) Commercial Fisheries Began around 1820 Expanded 20 per year Best was in 1889 and 1899, over by 1950s Provinces set annual limits and licenses Around 80 of value is in Lake Erie, therefore no fishing is allowed on the Southern (American) side Dont really do this anymore Forestry 1830 commercial logging began Paper making slowly began, now we are world leaders Pollution from production and loss of resources is a problem 80 of Ontario is forested = 85 billion trees Most towns have at least one forestrelated industry 80 of forests are owned by the province, 9 is parks Volatile industry (but not as bad as people think) 14 billion in 2008, mostly in pulp and paper Around 200,000 direct and indirect jobs 40 of 260 forestry communities say they are highly dependent of the industry
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