Class Notes (836,838)
Canada (509,920)
Lecture

Plato and Aristotle - November 7, 2013.docx

3 Pages
140 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
Political Science 2237E
Professor
Mike Laurence
Semester
Fall

Description
Final Remarks on Plato November 7, 2013 The Relationship between Plato and Democracy • If you believe in democracy, you have to consider the Platonic/Aristocratic  critique of democracy.  For Plato, democracy is when the people rule according to  their unnecessary desires and appetites of the people – can only be controlled to a  certain extent (but better than tyranny). • Infinite substitutability of all things (isonomia)/total equality and  interchangeability between all things is democracy.  For Plato, this is what  democracy is – and rejects this system.  He would rather people be developed and  positioned according to their naturally abilities – a political system should allow  natural hierarchies and inequalities to flourish.  To be free for him, is to develop  one’s natural aptitudes in one’s natural setting. • The basic critique of Plato against democracy is that it’s anarchic.  The democrat  is therefore someone who has no control over their appetites, because he or she  behaves as if they are all equal – no ability to rule themselves with reason.  They  would succumb to whatever pleasures that they desire. They cannot prioritize  their desires, and would therefore be ruled by their passions. • The destruction of natural hierarchies leads to chaos and loss of stability and  order.  People should be attributed to specific roles and functions in society  according to their natural abilities and functions.  The educational system will  reveal where people are to be placed.  • There is an even more fundamental critique of democracy in Plato’s Republic: o Democracy is not a regime or constitution is at all. o Arkhe = “founding principle or logic” which decides where in a society  people are to reside and why.  It is the principle of the ordering of society.   Arkhe of Olig­archy = rule of the wealthy few; hierarchy  determined by position of wealth.  Arkhe of Timo­cracy = vote is based off of land ownership;  hierarchy determined/rooted in possession of property.  Arkhe of Mon­archy =   Arkhe of Kallipolis  = those who have access to the  forms/knowledge of the good; the degree to which you’ve come  out of the cave determines your position.  Arkhe of Demo­cracy = ??? Plato argues that democracy does not have an arkhe.  There is no  principle that determines (properly speaking) who rules over who  and why.  A proper political regime has to have an arkhe, and  democracy doesn’t have one.  Thus, it should not be.   *Ancient Greek/Athenian democracy is not the same as  contemporary democracy, in which the assembly was a random  selection. Jacques Ranciere on Plato • Plato’s Republic justifies a hierarchical politics rather than democratic politics.   For this reason, Plato is problematic and promotes police order. • The goal for Plato is therefore preserving the order that exists, and prevent people  from revolting or protesting – it suppresses the people.  • Democracy happens when those assigned to a rigid place rise up from their  hierarchies. • Ranciere se
More Less

Related notes for Political Science 2237E

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit