Class Notes (837,610)
Canada (510,370)
Lecture

Foucault on Power - March 19th, .docx

4 Pages
99 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
Political Science 2237E
Professor
Mike Laurence
Semester
Fall

Description
Foucault on Power March 19 , 2014 In responding to Chomsky, he says that in order to envision a different society, we have  to unmask institutions that claim to be objective.  Power will always re­adjust itself to  reform and changes in political structures – it will always adapt! He is challenging the pure middle understanding of power (the sovereign conception of  power), which is exerted onto an obedient population. Arendt also challenged it. Foucault  is saying that power merges in many different relationships – it does not just come from  the top. Up until this point he is the same as Arendt.  • Contemporary examples are very political, because they are not usually  recognized as political. Things like grades and transcripts are actually technique  and tactics in political power that start from the bottom. • We cannot assume that the law is uniform and supreme, or that the state is  completely sovereign. We cannot assume any overall domination, because we  cannot begin with metatheories. Post­modernity is the condition in which we can  no longer believe in grand narratives or meta narratives that explain all of society. • We have to look at the concrete and the empirical – from the roots. This is where  contemporary theory must come from. This leads to the realization that power is  actually much more omniscient and omnipresent. • Much broader than Arendt’s approach.  Types of Power   – They can mix!  1. Sovereign Power – No longer the predominant way that power operates in  society, but we still continue to think of power in this way. It is both historical and  a discourse or way of theorizing power. Foucault describes this power as the right  to kill a subject. Thus, places that still employ the death penalty are examples of  contemporary sovereign power systems. This power actually died out with the rise  of… 2. Disciplinary Power – The question is how to preserve order and govern the  dangerous intermixing of bodies and difference. Disciplinary Power is the answer.  It is about mobilizing these bodies to the task of production. Addresses itself to  particular individuals – evaluates individuals on the singular level. 3. Biopower – Unlike disciplinary, emerges with the invention of statistic modeling.  Health is a primary area where this is used. This is more about the macro than the  micro theory of power. One cannot be outside of power. Traditionally political theory has conceptionalized  power as a very limited sphere (e.g. the distinction of the private and public realm  presupposes an existence outside of power). He claims to analyze power, to see how it  operates to understand how individuals are manageable entities. Disciplinary Power Different than sovereign power, it is present at the micro level. It is destination! It applies  itself to movements such as factories, schools, militaries and the way soldiers are trained  to move their bodies. Certain bodily movements are prescribed for some people.  • Disciplinary Power at Work  Foucault was one of the greatest resources we have for assessing our current  surveillance society. With sovereign power, it exerted itself through the violence on the body, and application  of the King’s power. Now we have the time table of prisoners – it is not the same, but  much more effective of this type of power. We are not actually becoming more humane in  controlling people and populations, but are just more effective. (e.g. Not ripping limbs off  of prisoners in the square, but something far worse).  1     Centu y Looking at the plague, when it breaks out, everything was recorded – what was to be  done and what happened. • Barricading and prohibition on leaving the town. Those who disobey are punished  with death. • Each how was to be locked from the outside, where a quarantine was imposed.  The idea was that you had enough rations to survive.  • Families were grounded to one place (locked in), with movement punishable by  death or severe penalty. • The plague was representative of one of the most dangerous intermixing of bodies  and confusion. For them it represented confusions, met only through order and  disciplinary measures. This type of power emerged in response to the plague.  • From this point the
More Less

Related notes for Political Science 2237E

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit