Class Notes (835,426)
Canada (509,186)
Psychology (6,249)
Rod Martin (58)
Lecture

lecture8.docx

6 Pages
42 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
Psychology 2310A/B
Professor
Rod Martin
Semester
Fall

Description
Mood Disorders Introduction • Depression versus Mania • DSM­IV distinguishes two general patterns: o Unipolar – depression only ▯ periods of depression, never mania o Bipolar – both mania and depression Unipolar Depression • “Normal” depression o “Psychological pain” ▯ tells us there is something wrong with our life, there is a  healing process that needs to take place o For example: the grief process o Similar to physical pain, if we didn’t have pain we would be dead  • DSM­IV categories: o Major depression o Dysthymic disorder (Dysthymia) ▯ clinically depressed for at least two years o Adjustment disorder with depressed mood ▯ clinical depression often based on  some stressful life event (lasts shorter amount of time, approx. 6 months) • Depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide, according to WHO o Costs more in treatment and lost productivity than anything but heart disease o Canada – $14.4 billion per year in terms of treatment and lost productivity DSM: Major Depressive Episode • Episodes usually lasts about 6 months to a year, then may come back later (episodic) • 5 or more symptoms lasting 2+ weeks • Most of the day nearly every day • Mood symptoms (one must be present): o Depressed mood o Loss of interest or pleasure in activities (anhedonia) ▯ absence of positive mood • Physical symptoms: o Significant weight loss (common in severe cases) or gain o Insomnia (severe cases) or hypersomnia o Psychomotor agitation or retardation (becoming completely immobile or  catatonic) o Fatigue, loss of energy (feeling extremely tired, unmotivated) • Cognitive Symptoms: o Feelings of worthlessness or guilt (often imagined) o Diminished ability to think or concentrate (very distractible, everything is a big  task ▯ getting dressed) o Recurrent thoughts of death, suicidal ideation • Symptoms must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in functioning • NB – depression is a “syndrome” Major Depressive Disorder • Presence of Major Depressive Episode (at least one) • No history of manic or hypomanic episodes • Subtypes: Single episode vs. recurrent • Specifiers: o Mild, moderate, severe without psychotic features, severe with psychotic features  (really clear loss of contact with reality: hallucinations and/or delusions ▯ common   for severe depression) o Atypical – oversleep, overeat, weight gain, anxiety (more common type) o With Catatonic features ▯ person can become completely immobile  o With Melancholic features ▯ severe form of depression with a particularly strong  biological aspect (more genetic heritability) o With Postpartum onset ▯ in a mother who has recently given birth (in the last four  weeks) o With Seasonal pattern ▯ seasonal affective disorder (SAD) common in the winter  (possible changes in melatonin levels causing the changes in mood with the  seasons) How common is clinical depression? • In any given year: 1,500,000 (5% of pop) Canadians ▯ 400,000 people in Ontario • At any one time: approximately 6% of women and 3% of men  • Lifetime prevalence: approximately 12% of women and 6% of men • Prevalence has increased dramatically over the past century • WHO: leading cause of disability worldwide • 2:1 ratio Women: Men Course • First episodes usually adolescence or early adulthood, but can happen at any age • Typically precipitated by a severe stressor (break­up, loss of job, divorce, etc) • Episodes typically last 6 months to 1 year • A person who has one episode of depression will, on average, go on to have 5 or 6  episodes o 1 episode: 50% risk of a second o 2 episodes: 70% risk of a third o 3+ episodes: 90% risk of more • Variable course: full versus partial remission between episodes Associated features • Elevated risk of suicide o Approximately 15% of people with severe depression commit suicide • Comorbidity o Anxiety disorders (50%) ▯ eg, panic, OCD, GAD, etc o Eating disorders ▯ anorexia, bulimia, etc o Substance abuse ▯ way of soothing themselves o Borderline personality disorder Other Unipolar Depression Diagnoses • Dysthymic Disorder ▯ mild level, typically able to function o Depressed mood most of the day, more days than not, for at least 2 years o Problems of appetite, sleep, energy, low self­esteem, poor concentration, hopeless  feelings o Tends to be chronic and life­long o “Double depression” – Dysthymia plus major depressive episodes  Chronically depressed with episodes where they meat the criteria for  major depressive episodes • Adjustment disorder with depressed mood
More Less

Related notes for Psychology 2310A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit