Class Notes (835,384)
Canada (509,147)
Psychology (6,249)
Lecture

Psych 2301 - Lecture 1.docx

15 Pages
104 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
Psychology 3301F/G
Professor
Graham Reid
Semester
Spring

Description
Psych 2301B ­ Prevention 04/22/2014 Prevention Objectives: Understand the relation between the relation between community psychology & prevention Understand the distinction between different types of prevention Be able to give examples of types of prevention programs Community Psychology Branch of psychology concerned with the reciprocal relationship between the community and the individual Mental health is not only internal/intrinsic rather it has to do with the interaction between various social  setting and systems Principles: Pathology due to interaction between the individual & social settings and systems Organizational & community bases for problems Practice & intervention at the community level Community needs & risks assessed proactively Consultation model Interventions by paraprofessionals, non­professionals & self­help groups Emphasis on prevention Theory: Empowerment Prevention of feelings of powerless Building competence in high risk groups Collaborative interventions Ecology Social systems change Prevention & health promotion Ecological model of environmental influences Immediate environments are closer to the child in the middle More indirect environments are closer to the outside Each level interacts with other levels and within their level Unique: Talks about interactions between each level and the consequences  Parenting stress plays a role on effective parenting to the child Ex. Changing the time that h/s students in the morning will affect the attendance and well­being off the  student – school board acting on the child The intervention spectrum for childhood disorders. Continuum of prevention and treatment All members would receive intervention prior to having any symptoms or disorders – idea is providing this to  prevent any disorders from happening Universal prevention example: vaccination, phys.ed in school Selective prevention example: nurses and TB tests Indicated prevention example – adolescents whose mothers’ have depression  Approaches to Prevention Primary prevention: Intervention before a disorder has developed To prevent its occurrence Secondary prevention: Intervention after the onset of the disorder Usually called treatment Tertiary Prevention With chronic disorders Focus on rehabilitation and long­term adaptation Distinctions Among Programs: Universal preventive interventions: Applied to the general population (e.g., vaccines) Selective preventive interventions: Targeted to individuals at high risk of developing a disorder Indicative preventive interventions: Targeted to individuals at high risk and showing subclinical signs of the disorders Examples of Preventive Interventions Universal Preventive Intervention I CAN DO Purpose: Implemented and evaluated a 13­session school­based primary prevention program designed to teach children coping skills. Method: Practice of the skills was applied to 5 stressful experiences that are likely to occur to a significant number of children: parental separation/divorce, loss of a loved one, move to a new home or school, spending significant time in self­care, and being different (e.g., ethnically, physically). Subjects: 88 4th graders were assigned to either an immediate­ or delayed­intervention group. Results: Program effects were found on improvement in children's ability to generate a repertoire of effective solutions to the stressful situations, as well as in their self­efficacy to implement effective solutions. Most of these effects were maintained or strengthened at 5­mo follow­up. No effects were found on knowledge of facts about the stressors or size of children's support networks. Dubow et al. (1993). Teaching children to cope with stressful experiences: Initial implementation and evaluation of a primary prevention program. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology. 22(4), 428­440. Risk factors are things that indicate the likelihood of the development of a disorder The better the social support a person has, the lower their chances of psychopathological disorder – it is a  protective factor “People who can help” list – get people to list their social supports Cognitive­behavioral intervention Do this prevention program and then you wait for the 5 stressful experiences to occur – the kids who  experiences these events have a higher chance of psychopathology Target children before they had problems – prevention; the entire grade 4 class that was willing to  participate (no indication of a high­risk environment) ­ universal I CAN DO: Worry Warts Some kids use WORRY WARTS as reasons to not ask for help. This does not help solve kids’ problems. In  fact, WORRY WARTS may make the problem worse 1. “Asking for help is embarrassing” maybe, but if you ask someone who cares about you for help, they won’t make fun of you or stop liking you 2. “Your problem isn’t important” if a problem bothers you, it is important 3. “You’re a baby if you can’t solve your own problems” nobody can solve all of their problems. Asking for help is one way to solve problems Examples of Preventive interventions Selective Preventive Intervention – Carolina Abecedarian (first) Project – high­risk group Risk & Protective Factors: Academic failure, lack of readiness for school, economic deprivation & low level  of commitment to school Target Population Group – children, but in a prenatal clinic Prenatal clinic & Dept of Social Services Research Design 1. control/control = no intervention (n=22) 2. control/
More Less

Related notes for Psychology 3301F/G

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit