Class Notes (837,548)
Canada (510,312)
Psychology (6,261)
Psychology 1000 (2,472)
Prof (56)
Lecture

PSYCH 1000 – Ch 11 Emotional.docx

6 Pages
62 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
Psychology 1000
Professor
Prof
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYCH 1000 – Ch 11 Emotional, Stress, and Health January 21, 2014 What makes you “stressed”? How might stress impact/influence memory? Affects body by – sweat, lack of focus,  stress eating, increase blood pressure/ heart rate, mood Affects memory – can affect our enhancement, forget things,   The Nature of Emotion • Emotion is a state of arousal involving: o Physiological changes in the face, brain, and body o Cognitive process such as interpretation of events o Cultural influences that shape the experience and expression of emotion Emotions and the Body • Primary Emotions o Emotions considered to be universal and biologically based  o Generally include fear, anger, sadness, joy, surprise, disgust, and  contempt. • Secondary emotions • Emotions that develop with cognitive maturity and vary across individuals and  cultures. Eg. Pride The Face of Emotion • Evolutionary explanations say that emotions are hard­wired and have survival  functions. o Evidence for the universality of 7 facial expressions of emotion  Anger, happiness, fear, surprise, disgust, sadness, and contempt.  Emotions recognized cross­culturally   Genuine versus fake emotions can be distinguished  Functions of Facial Expressions  • Facial expressions reflect our internal feelings, but can also influence them • Facial feedback: ­ The process by which the facial muscles send messages to the  brain about the basic emotion being expressed • Emotions help us communicate emotional states and signal others (survival value) o Begins in infancy, babies convey emotions and can interpret parental  expressions Facial Expressions and Culture • Cultural and social limits to the universal readability of facial expressions: o People better at identifying emotions in own ethnic, national, or regional  grouop o Facial expressions can have different meaning within a culture o Facial expressions do not always represent the emotion being experienced  Mirror Neurons • Mirror neurons: ­ Brain cells that fire when a person or animal observes others  carrying out an action, they are involved in empathy, limitation, and reading  emotions • Mood contagion: ­ A mood spreading from one person to another, as facial  expressions of emotion in the first person generate emotions in the other o Nonverbal signals can cue emotional responses in others as well Emotion and the Mind • Experience of emotion depends on two factors: o Physiological arousal and cognitive interpretation o We feel emotions when we can label the physiological changes…but may  not always be accurate Attributions and Emotions • Attributions o The explanations that people make of their own and other people’s  behavior. o Your interpretation of behavior generates the emotional response (e.g.,  how you explain outcome of winning silver medal instead of gold?). o Relates to upwards and downwards social comparisons, complex  emotions, and our ability to feel conflicting emotions at the same time. Cognitions and Emotional Complexity • Cognitions affect emotions, and emotional states affect cognitions • Some emotions require only simple cognitions or may involved conditioned  responses (e.g., infants) • Cognitive and emotional developments occur together, become more complex  with age and experience. Emotion and Culture • Some researchers say individuals may differ in likelihood of feeling secondary  emotions o Primary emotions considered prototype of the concept emotion o Young children express prototypical emotions first through words o As children age, emotional distinctions specific to their language and  culture emerge • Other researchers argue that no aspect of emotion is untouched by culture or  context • Some cultures have words for specific emotions unknown to other cultures (e.g.,  schadenfreude, hagaii) • Some cultures lack words for emotions that seem universal (e.g., Tahitans lack  word for sadness) • Culture may influence which emotions are defined as basic or primary Communicating Emotions • Display rules o Social and cultural rules that regulate when, how, and where a person may  express (or must suppress) emotions • Body language o Nonverbal signals of body movement, posture, gesture, and gaze. o Some signals of body language may be universal (e.g., movements that  reflect displeasure, tension, grief, anger) o Discomfort when body language and conversations are mismatched  Emotion and Gender • Little evidence that one sex feels any of the everyday emotions more often than  the other • But…people see what they expect to see (stereotypes guide expectations) o Western cultures associate “angry” with males and “happy” with females • Differences exist in how emotions are expressed, and how they are perceived by  others Emotional Expressiveness • Stereotypical gender differences may arise from the fact that women are more  willing to express their feelings • Women are likely to… o Smile more often o Gaze at listeners more o Have more emotionally expressive faces o Use expressive hand and body movements o Touch others more often o Talk about their emotions • North American men only express on emotion more freely than women: o Anger towards strangers, especially other men, when challenged or  insulted o Expectation that men will control or mask negative emotions o Consequence is increas
More Less

Related notes for Psychology 1000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit