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Lecture

Coding.docx

3 Pages
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Department
Sociology
Course Code
Sociology 3307F/G
Professor
Georgios Fthenos

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Coding, Thematic Analysis and Transcription 19 March 2014 - what is coding? - since coding is an important and sometime most difficult phase of qualitative data analysis - several examples will be provided to illustrate how coding is done - however, the coding methods shown are not the only way to go about coding qualitative data ad there are several methods - coding is the process of examining the raw qualitative data (which will be in the form of words, phrases, sentences or paragraphs) and assigning codes or labels - Strauss and Corbin (1990) identified the following types of coding: axial coding and open Coding - open coding and axial coding: - open coding – you “sweep” through the data and mark (by circling or highlighting) sections of the text selected codes or labels - for example, you circle words or phrases describing violent criminal victimization (ex. Beaten, kicked, punched, stabbed, etc. - axial coding – eventually, you have a large number of codes and you will find it necessary to sort them into some sort of order or into groups and this is called axial coding - two common types of axial coding are: non-hierarchical or hierarchical - non-hierarchical: - non hierarchical: for example, in a study the researcher asked a group of adults how they take a break from their normal world - the responses are grouped are grouped as follows in a non-hierarchical manner (flat coding: - codes/labels  theme/category - hierarchical: - several codes group together as types or kinds of something - you need to put some of the codes or labels into a group of their own or make them sub-codes - i.e. a hierarchical arrangement of codes, like a tree, a branching arrangement of sub- codes - ideally, codes in a tree relate to their parents by being “examples of…” or ‘contexts for…’ or ‘causes of…’ or ‘settings for…’ and so on - for example, a researcher was doing a study on “friendship” and asked a group of adults their views on the topic………………….. - whenever you find a meaningful segment of text in a transcript, you assign a code or label to signify that particular segment - you continue this process until you have segmented all of your data and have completed the initial coding - next, you find the relationships between the codes or labels and group them into themes or categories - what to look for: - when coding, you usually have some codes already in mind and are also looking for other ideas that seem to arise out of the data - you should ask the following questions about the data you are coding: - what is going on? - what are people doing? - what is the person saying? - what do these actions and statements take for granted? - how do structure and context serve to support, maintain, impede or change these actions and statements? - summary: - coding is the process of examining the raw qualitative data which will in the form of words, phrases, sentences or paragraphs) and assigning CODES or labels - open coding – you “sweep” through the data and mark (by circling or highlighting) s
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