Class Notes (834,721)
Canada (508,692)
CS100 (222)
Lecture

8. TV Times OH.docx
Premium

6 Pages
73 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication Studies
Course
CS100
Professor
Martin Morris
Semester
Fall

Description
CS 100B INTRODUCTION TO MEDIAHISTORY WINTER, 2014 Dr. Martin Morris 8. TV Times Introduction: Three Types of Interaction 1. Face­to­face interaction 2. Mediated interaction 3. Mediated quasi­interaction [On this typology, see Thompson, “Three Types of Interaction” from our MYLS] Edmund Carpenter, “The New Languages” What is the bias of television compared to other media? “The child is right in not regarding commercials as interruptions…”  — TV is a flow in contrast to the photograph and other media. “This is real drama, in process, with the outcome uncertain. Print can't do this; it has a different  bias. Books and movies only pretend uncertainty, but live TV retains this vital aspect of life.  Seen on TV, the fire in the 1952 Democratic Convention threatened briefly to become a  conflagration; seen on newsreel, it was history, without potentiality.  “It is significant that of the four new media, the three most recent are dramatic media,  particularly TV, which combines language, music, art, dance.  “Media differences such as these mean that it's not simply a question of communicating a single  idea in different ways but that a given idea or insight belongs primarily, though not exclusively,  to one medium, and can be gained or communicated best through that medium.  “Each medium selects its ideas.” “Facial expression is a human experience rendered immediately visible without the intermediary  of word… Printing rendered illegible the faces of men… —“Just as radio helped bring back inflection in speech, so film and TV are aiding us in  the recovery of gesture and facial awareness For example, the Caine Mutiny “…new languages, instead of destroying old ones, serve as a stimulant to them. Only monopoly  is destroyed.” 1 —“Print, along with all old languages, including speech, has profited enormously from  the development of the new media. —theatre acquires more freedom and evolves in reaction to cinema “Yet a new language is rarely welcomed by the old [language].” “This same statement goes for all media: each offers a unique presentation of reality, which when  new has a freshness and clarity that is extraordinarily powerful.” The University of Toronto lecture experiment conclusion: “…each communication channel  codifies reality differently and thus influences, to a surprising degree, the content of the message  communicated. A medium is not simply an envelope that carries any letter; it is itself a major part  of that message.” Lynn Spigel, “Making Room for TV” “…in postwar years the television set became a central figure in representations of family  relationships. The family united Where to put the TV? “In 1951, when American Home first displayed a television set on its cover photograph, it  employed the conventionalized iconography of a model living room organized around the  fireplace, but this time a television set was built into the mantelpiece. Even more radically, the  television was shown to replace the fireplace altogether, as the magazines showed readers how  television could function as the center of family attention.  “More typically, the television set took the place of the piano… The new ‘entertainment centers’  comprised of a radio, television, and phonograph, often made the piano entirely obsolete. — decline of performed music in the home “The home magazines helped to construct television as a household object, one that belonged in  the family space… television itself became the central figure in images of the American home; it  became the cultural symbol par excellence of family life.  —The TV was meant to bring the family together (especially after WWII) “The emergence of the term ‘family room’ in the postwar period is a perfect example of the  importance attached to organizing household spaces around ideals of family togetherness. “What was needed was a particular attitude, a sense of closeness that permeated the room.  2 — the family circle with all members of the family present represented pictorally Family life or single life? — postwar challenges to ‘normality’ and gender roles (M&F) —advertising says: TV has the ability to bring the family together around it. One respondent from a Southern California survey boasted that his “family now stays home all  the time and watches the same programs. [We] turn it on at 3 P.M. and watch until 10 P.M. We  never go anywhere”  — keeping the kids home and off the streets Mitchell Stephens, “Television Transforms the News” “Radio gave newsmongers back their voices; television restored their faces. Indeed, the  television newscast seems to resemble that most ancient of methods for communicating news: a  person telling other people what has happened. But this resemblance … can be misleading.  “The technology of television was perfected by radio networks. And by 1941 CBS was  broadcasting two fifteen­minute
More Less

Related notes for CS100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit