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CS101 (166)
Lecture

Intellectual Property.pdf

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Department
Communication Studies
Course
CS101
Professor
Carolyn Ensley
Semester
Fall

Description
Virtual Lecture▯ ▯ Cultural Texts/Production come to be seen as property? ▯ - How do they own what’s in the mind?▯ - Innovative or creative thoughts - Intellectual property.▯ - -hLive in highly mediated life, you are able to get away from it.▯ ▯ When we consume media, are we consuming someone else’s property?▯ - If we consume media show ▯ - Ex. Friends▯ - It still exists and isn’t destroyed. Is a new form of consumption in media world.▯ - What happens when you have two forms of use and the law is based on use.▯ ▯ - 1538 or 1476: Printing press invented▯ - caused issues:▯ - Printing press came without production▯ - Who controlled dissemination of materials▯ - Publishers - knowledge, problems with sovereignty ▯ ▯ - -538: Henry 8th - clamped down on publishers.▯ -30Open publication▯collecting taxes ex. for publishing.▯ - Print bill, carried and shown to people to show they could do what they were doing.▯ - Conflicting patents were issued over lifetime.▯ - 1556: Royal Warrant for Guild of Printers.▯ ▯ - 1710: Most combined into general law - Statute of Ann▯ - Copyright became a relationship between author, publisher, and disseminator of knowledge.▯ - License to copy.▯ - Copyright was 14 year licence.▯ - Period of time to profit▯ - had to put into repository - in a book.▯ - Repealed in 1842 by first copyright act.▯ - -tgot rid of mess off patents▯ - 1624: Attempted to clean up plurality of monopolies of the world.▯ - Letter of protectionism in form of mercantilism.▯ - Giving rights to powerful merchants. for profit▯ - Protecting rights of merchants, sell their products.▯ - transformed it to a different set of relations - contemporary patent.▯ ▯ ▯ ▯ ▯ ▯ Steps To Have A Patent▯ 1. New Idea - must be published▯ 3. Uniqueness - not used or done before.▯nal▯ 4. Must not be contrary to current law - ex. patented idea for a murder device.▯ 5. Must not be raising price of commodity at home or otherwise. Increase efficiency, not prices to create instability in the economy at home.▯ 6. Nor to the heard of trades - trading overseas shouldn’t be difficult▯ 7. Shouldn't be generally inconvenient.▯ ▯ ▯ - -641: First patent issued.▯ -xRight to exclude people from exploiting your product.▯period of time.▯ ▯ ▯ ▯ Trademark & Trade Dress▯ Trade Dress: Things that surround your brand.▯ ▯ Ex. Certain type of clothing you wear - appearance.▯ ▯ Trademark: sign or design or expression that identifies a product or service in a field that is -iDon’t want appearance of similarity▯ - Consumer protection▯ - Allows to claim exclusivity.▯ - Prevent brand piracy and counterfeit goods.▯ - Exclusively identifying brand▯ ▯ - 1383: First trademark▯ - Brewing▯ - 1875: England trademark▯ - -asProtects goodwill of trader without damaging goodwill.▯ - Lower brand value if made worse than actual brand▯ ▯ ▯ Trade Secrets▯ - Four basic intellectual properties that we use.▯ - Strongest of intellectual properties - don’t tell anyone.▯ - Ex. Coca-Cola recipe.▯ - - Ownership conveys a economic benefit▯ - Enables you to make profit because it isn’t generally known▯ ▯ ▯ ▯ - In Canada: Must improve economic value of business▯ - Strongest production you can have is trade secret▯ - Second: Patent▯ - Third: Copyright▯ - Trademark is similar to copyright▯ ▯ - Keeping things secret is important in business and professional life.▯ - Ex. Way a lawyer does things - knowledge they have with training.▯ ▯ - -oral Rights of the Author▯ - Different rights - US doesn’t have them▯ - People cannot use your work to do anything other than what it is used for without your permission.▯ - Can be waved by contract, but cannot be assigned or licensed.▯ - Retain your rights for the length of copyright.▯ - They cannot change it unless you give them a waiver.▯ - Cannot take your name off of your work.▯ ▯ - Copyright and where we allow exemptions.▯ - Canada: Fair Dealing▯ - Limitation exception to copyright law.▯ ▯ 6 Principles for Dealing With Fair Dealing▯ 1. Purpose: Resear
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