HI330 Lecture Notes - Lecture 12: Slave Narrative, New York City English, Haitian Revolution

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Published on 16 Apr 2013
School
WLU
Department
History
Course
HI330
Professor
HI330 Slavery, Expansionism and Escalating Sectional Conflict
March 19, 2013
-How the nation got so angry about slavery
-How slave holders defended their institution
-Aspects of the white south and aspects of slaveholders lives
-Antislavery movement doesn’t pop up out of nowhere
-Religious developments People could change or even perfect their world
-By 1861 there were nearly 4 million slaves in the US
-Some people believed that they wanted to extend freedom to everyone
-This lead to a small upswing, some being willing to privately free
their slaves, and some laws, which permitted private manumission
-No groundswell for abolition after the Civil War
-Small percentage of the population that is willing to challenge the existence
of the institution Quakers, free blacks, slaves
-By the start of the 19th century, many antislavery advocates were using
gradual methods and wanted to end the slave trade (partially successful
trans-Atlantic), and worked on the very gradual and impractical method of
colonizing free slaves to African and other places
-Many of the motivations were very racist colonization depended on
the belief that other races could never gain equality with whites
-There weren’t any concrete or feasible plans to bring it about
-Popular idea
-There methods were never very popular
-Quakers
-Radical religious group
-Key to both the British and US anti-slavery movements
-Starting in the 1770s Quarkers began to free their slaves and stop their
participation in the trans-Atlantic slave trade
-Started schools for blacks
-Thought that the institution of slavery displeased God God would be angry
with slave holders
-Opposed to using political methods for reform needed to separate their
moral causes from politics
-Moral Suasion
-Appealed to the individuals conscious and tried to make people see
the sin of slave owning
-Sarah and Angelina Grimke converted to the Quaker faith and left
to South to become public advocates against slavery
-Instrumental in the early arguments against slavery
-Shift to radicalism was something that AA and Whites were engaging in
-1829 David Walker published Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World
-Used the bible and the Constitution to argue that everyone deserved
freedom
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-He said slavery is such a crime you should use any method you can to
escape and get ride of it
-Influential among other black abolitionists
-Early 1830s
-Slavery was spreading to the west and growing stronger in southern
economy
-William Lloyd Garrison Bostonian and white man
-Took a few very big steps after Walker’s appeal
-Published The Liberator which was founded for the purpose of
abolition
-Founder of the American Anti-Slavery Society (first national)
-Making strong public pronouncements against the institution
in his newspaper
-Him and his fellow abolitionists became the most radical in
the anti-slavery movement
-Immediatists their beliefs
-1831 organized action
-Wanted more immediate emancipation immediate
-Refused to pay slave holders for the values of slaves
-Anyone who condoned slavery in any way was committing a sin
-Consumer Boycott don’t buy things that are produced by slave
labour
-Saw women as equals and argued for women’s rights
-Wanted pacifism among other causes
-Against colonization method
-Saw slavery in moral and spiritual terms
-Wanted to sway people through conversation show how slavery
was a sin - offense against morality and God
-Secular views
-Literal interpretation of the Declaration of Independence
-Garrison militant and well-spoken man
-Made many enemies
-Bible and the Constituion if they support slavery he was
willing to burn the Constitution and they shouldn't be
following the bible
-Wanted the North to remove themselves from the
Constitution and Dominion
-Moral and spiritual awakened during the Second Great Awakening
-Concept called the “Higher Law Doctrine”
-Idea they should follow the higher law
-Should break people’s laws (i.e. Fugitive Slave Act) in order to
follow God’s laws
-Wanted women and men to follow God’s laws
-Deliberately provocative
-New societies in the 1830s and 1840s published newspaper, slave
narratives, etc
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Document Summary

Hi330 slavery, expansionism and escalating sectional conflict. How the nation got so angry about slavery. Aspects of the white south and aspects of slaveholders lives. Antislavery movement doesn"t pop up out of nowhere. Religious developments people could change or even perfect their world. By 1861 there were nearly 4 million slaves in the us. Some people believed that they wanted to extend freedom to everyone. This lead to a small upswing, some being willing to privately free their slaves, and some laws, which permitted private manumission. No groundswell for abolition after the civil war. Small percentage of the population that is willing to challenge the existence of the institution quakers, free blacks, slaves. Many of the motivations were very racist colonization depended on the belief that other races could never gain equality with whites. There weren"t any concrete or feasible plans to bring it about. Key to both the british and us anti-slavery movements.

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