Class Notes (835,487)
Canada (509,209)
York University (35,236)
ADMS 3531 (30)
all (27)
Lecture

lecture_11 notes.docx

6 Pages
98 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Administrative Studies
Course
ADMS 3531
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Personal Investment Management ADMS 3531 ­ Fall 2011 – Professor Dale Domian Lecture 11 – Mutual Funds – Nov 29 Chapter 5 Outline ­ Investment companies and fund types. ­ Mutual fund operations. ­ Mutual fund costs and fees. ­ Short­term funds. ­ Long­term funds. ­ Mutual fund performance. ­ Closed­end funds, exchange traded funds, and hedge funds.  ­ Registered retirement savings plans. ­ Income trusts. Mutual Funds ­ The buy and sell decisions for the resulting pool are then made by a fund manager, who is  compensated for the service provided. ­ Like commercial banks and life insurance companies, mutual funds are a form of  financial intermediary. Investment Companies ­ An investment company is business that specializes in pooling funds from individual  investors and making investments. Fund Types ­ A closed­end fund is an investment company with a fixed number of shares that are  bought and sold by investors, only in the open market.  ­ An open­end fund is an investment company that stands ready to buy and sell shares in it  to investors, at any time. Investment Companies and Fund Types ­ Net asset value (NAV) is the value of the assets held by a mutual fund, divided by the  number of shares. ­ Shares in an open­end fund are worth their NAV, because the fund stands ready to redeem  their shares at any time. In contrast, share value of closed­end funds may differ from their  NAV. Mutual Fund Operations Organization ­ A mutual fund is simply a corporation. It is owned by shareholders, who elect a board of  directors.  ­ Most mutual funds are created by investment advisory firms (say Fidelity Investments),  or brokerage firms with investment advisory operations. Investment advisory firms earn  fees for managing mutual funds. Mutual Fund Operations ­ Mutual funds are required by law to supply a prospectus to any investor who wishes to  purchase shares. ­ Mutual funds must also provide an annual report to their shareholders. Mutual Fund Costs and Fees ­ Sales chargers or ‘loads’ o Front­end loads are charges levied on purchases. o Back­end loads are charges levied on redemptions.  ­ Management fees o Usually range from 0.25% to 1% of the funds total assets each year.  o Are usually based on fund size and/or performance. ­ Trading costs o Not reported directly.  o Funds must report ‘turnover,’ which is related to the amount of trading.  o The higher the turnover, the more trading has occurred in the fund. o The more trading, the higher the trading costs.  ­ Mutual funds are required to report expenses in a fairly standardized way in their  prospectus.  o Shareholder transaction expenses – loads and deferred sales charges. ­ After all, many good no­load funds exist.  ­ But, you may want a fund run by a particular manager. All such funds are load funds. ­ Or, you may want a specialized type of fund. o Perhaps one that specialized in Italian companies.  o Loads and fees for specialized funds tend to be higher, because there is little  competition among them. Short­Term Funds, I ­ Short­term funds are collectively known as money market mutual funds. ­ Money market mutual funds (MMMFs) are mutual funds specializing in money market  instruments. o MMMFs maintain a $1.00 net asset value to make them resemble bank accounts. Short­Term Funds, II ­ Most banks offer what are called ‘money market’ deposit accounts, or MMDAs, which  are much like MMMFs. ­ The distinction is that a bank money market account is a bank deposit and offers CDIC  protection. Long­Term Funds ­ There are many different types of long­term funds, i.e., funds that invest in long­term  securities.  ­ Historically, mutual funds were classified as stock funds, bond funds, or income funds.  ­ Nowadays, the investment objective of the fund is the major determinant of the fund type. Stock Funds ­ Some stock funds trade off capital appreciation and dividend income. o Capital appreciation. o Growth.
More Less

Related notes for ADMS 3531

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit