Class Notes (838,458)
Canada (510,890)
York University (35,470)
Anthropology (639)
ANTH 2170 (47)
Lecture

antropology unit2.docx

7 Pages
94 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTH 2170
Professor
Anna Pratt
Semester
Summer

Description
Lancaster’s article: The “Problems” with Nature: • Nature is ASSUMED to be equated with normalcy…If a behaviour can be shown  to be rooted in biology, then this is often used to justify mainstream behaviour/the  status quo  • They create a hierarchy as normalize and natural and others as deviant and  unnatural  Conservative, mainstream behaviours labelled as “natural”: • And by extension…. NORMAL, with an “ontological priority” • Labelling heterosexuality as “natural” “normal” you are creating a label for  certain group  • E.g. Martha McCaughey (from Lancaster reading)  “Anyone questioning the natural and therefore privileged status of heterosexuality today  is likely to meet up with an evolutionary narrative: After all, how could the human  species survive without heterosexuality?” Why do you think that we tend to privilege biological models? • Science has been associated with rational behavior, truth, and objectivity  • Uninfluenced by culture  • Live in a world where we value objectivity over subjectivity  Last Friday: Emily Martin Scientists influenced by culture (in this case, gender stereotypes) Culture shapes: ­The questions they ask/research question (example: much more money deposited for  popular diseases such as cancer rather than a disease that is one in a million)  ­How they present their data   ­In case of conception – gendered language and stereotypes Also: ­Gender inequalities in society are perpetuated (unconsciously) by scientists  – E.g. in martin article. Female Menstruation is seen as wasteful and talks about how  women are wasting so many eggs; menstruation is decay.  ­ Notion of being unsanitary and etc. in contrast the production of sperm is  discussed as a remarkable achievement.  ­ Martin says men are producing trillions of sperm that is being wasted compared to  women. The production of “wasteful” is never used for men.  ­ Human deception: as scientist are rethinking this process where we have some  changes that some scientist saying that the egg is more active;  ­ She states that even today scientist attempt to deal with gender type in terms of  there treatment and create an image of women as “dangerous” and “aggressive” ­ Different types of gender stereotypes are getting promoted  How does culture shape our identities?  Key Concepts: • Discipline­  • Docile bodies Michel Foucault • French historian and philosopher, 1926­1984 • Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison Modernity: • 1700­about 1950 • Interested in modern subject and how its created  • Marked by tremendous social and technological change • Enlightenment (1700­1800, roughly)­ a development of new forms of critical  thinking and philosophers. It stressed over rational behaviour and science was  objective; stressed over the importance of new technologies  • Lead to stress for the government because they needed new development to deal  with health issues  • Industrial Revolution and growth of capitalism, which led to population growth,  urbanization, etc. (age of discovery was created)  • Also led to increased concern with EFFICIENCY and time management • A period of time that was marked by crisis of order  • A period of huge socio­political and economical changes  • A period where rulers had to come up with new ways of creating orderly citizens  to minimizing conflict intentions  • Acted as the development of modernity in Europe  • Shifted to new social problems/economic that was an outgrowth of industrial  revolution  • Some problems: division of labour, running out of goods and services, 1/3 of  population dying from a disease (flu, chicken pox, polio), creates sanitation, high  crime rates, development of new sorts of crimes (theft, murder) Modernity resulted in: 1. The formation of a modern subject/individual who was concerned, among other  things, with notions of order and control. th th 2. A change in the ways in which power operates. Between 17  and 18  centuries –  DISCIPLINE – to manage people; discipline refers to different techniques of  management that centre upon the human body to create a discipline of population  • Looks at how the institution of bodies are created; include the  development of modern hospitals, prison, educational system, school,  militaries • All these institutions are development of maternity  • Make us live in a social accepted way Modernity – manipulation of bodies to create: • DOCILE BODIES­ one that obeys and does not talk back and maintains its status  quote  • Became important to make sure that people are behaving themselves  • To show how they are rooted in culture  Madness and Civilization, 1960 • Modernity and rise of “insane asylums” and psychiatric hospitals • “Mad” people became a social problem • Argues that various mental issues in the middle ages were not considered to be  problematic  • People would get locked away in hospital if it was a physical issue whereas the  same was not true if it was mental disorder  • Mental disorder for instance, skinopheremia were not accepted in the society in  the middle ages  • Development of “asylums”­ you would be locked away and no longer were  magical and rather were a criminal  • The idea was that if you punish the body and torture it than you should be able to  control their behavior  • Beatings against the body­ these were the forms of disciplining the body  Jonathan Crary – ADHD • Techniques of the Observer • Argues that ADHD as a cultural construction; its medicalization is a form of  discipline • Only from the adamant of values  • We see attentive bodies to be discipline bodies  • Create new ways of disciplining the body (how are bodies created in education  system? e.g. The organization of room ) Reading: Discipline and Punish, 1975 • “Culture of spectacle” to a “carceral culture”  • Interested in historical transformation of punishment as a result of modernity  • Up until 1700s in Europe criminals were punished through physical needs  • People were tortured publicly (executed publicly, hung publicly­ to give the  message of saying if you misbehave that’s what will happen)  • Public execution and public tortures gradually disappeared in 1718­1740  • There were new reforms were created (jail) Rules of New Punishment: 1
More Less

Related notes for ANTH 2170

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit