Class Notes (834,728)
Canada (508,699)
York University (35,162)
ENVS 2400 (33)
Harris Ali (11)
Lecture

Commentary for Polls, Politics and Sustainability.docx

3 Pages
50 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Environmental Studies
Course
ENVS 2400
Professor
Harris Ali
Semester
Winter

Description
­Shakeel Dilbar­ 211341815 –  Commentary on Winfield Reading – Polls, Politics and Sustainability Mark, S. Winfield estimated that changes in the current structure of the world economies  are necessary to achieve sustainability worldwide. Sustainability initiatives can only be realized  when the material intensity of each unit of economic output is reduced by 50 per cent and, in  industrial countries like Canada; it will have to fall by factors of between 4 and 10 as well as a  reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases on the order of 80 per cent relative to 1990 levels will  be required by the middle of this century. Winfield identified the need for public policy reform and institutional arrangements  around the management of the environment and natural resources, however despite this lack of  progress in the achievement of these sorts of changes due to externalities that reside in the sphere  of politics, there have been documented successes with the implementation of municipal Sewage  treatment in the Great Lakes basin; acid rain control in eastern Canada; reductions in water  pollution from the pulp and paper sector; and the phase­out of the production of certain harmful  substances, such as ozone depleting substances (ODS) and polychlorinated bi­phenols (PCBs) Winfield also acknowledged the fact that Canada’s GHG emissions have raised steadily  and in 1997, further highlighted that despite initially signing onto the 1997 Kyoto Protocol from  the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC), Canada’s 2004  emissions were recorded at levels, 34.6% higher than its initial Kyoto Protocol target for the  2008­2012 period.  The Commissioner for the Environment and Sustainable Development (CESD) has  repeatedly highlighted the overall failure of Canadian governments to implement international  and domestic environmental policy commitments and Winfield uncovers some of the political  truths that inadvertently hinder the implementation of sustainable development policies in  Canada. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), for its part, has  criticized Canada’s continued subsidization of non­renewable resource exploration and extraction  and failure to make significant use of economic instruments to move consumption patterns of  water or other resources in more sustainable directions, on a number of occasions. Winfield  acknowledged his egregious feelings about this non­renewable resource subsidy serving as an  obstacle in getting the Canadian economy to wean itself off the consumption of non­renewable  resources such as coal, oil and natural gas. Political successes and shortcomings of previous and incumbent Canadian Governments  with regard to environmental protection and global warming mitigation policies have been  documented by Winfield in this paper to be closely correlated to the level of public saliency on  the relevant issue being debated in Canadian politics. This correlation, Winfield refers to as the  ‘issue attention cycle’. It is a term is used to describe cycles of increased government activism  around an issue, which coincides with high levels of public concern or interest, and a decrease of  government action as public interest in an issue declines within the political arena. The democratic society that exists in Canada presently, allows for members of the public  who comprise the incumbent government and who are elected to office by the citizens of Canada  through due electoral process. Winfield stated that decision­making horizons are dominated by  the four to five year electoral cycle that defines the lives of Canadian governments.  Once elected  into office, these elected politicians are assigned a ministry portfolio which for the most will have  a time­scale of approximately 2 years for them to exact any policy reform. Winfield attributes  this short electoral cycle for an elected candidate as one of the main contributors for policy  failure. Winfield affectionately describes this occurrence as “policy attention deficit disorder on  the part of politicians.” For example, the Canadian environment ministers, tenure with the portfolio is typically  two years or less and as a result of this short time frame, decision­makers may feel little incentive  to invest in policy reform, and if they do attempt to exact change, the benefits may not be visible  until long after these ministers have left their portfolios and the governments of which they are  part have left office. The political sphere is a ruthless arena with limited time frames for all involved. However  the main driver for environmental policy implementation and reform continues to be the strong  relationship that exists between the public salience 
More Less

Related notes for ENVS 2400

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit