Class Notes (837,612)
Canada (510,370)
York University (35,409)
Humanities (1,683)
HUMA 1200 (23)
Lecture 18

Lecture 18-Feb 13.docx

2 Pages
145 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Humanities
Course
HUMA 1200
Professor
Jon Sufrin
Semester
Winter

Description
Feb 13, 2014 Japanese Internment in WW1 Official history Multiculturalism Push and pull factors Alienation Due to the attack on Pearl Harbor and much of Asia (including British territories) by the Japanese, Canada declared war on Japan in 1941 This had huge consequences for Japanese Canadians • Homes and property seized without compensation • Japanese evacuated from coastal British Columbia • Many men imprisoned • After the war, forced deportations and settlement programs prevented them from going back to coastal BC IS THIS UNDERSTANDABLE? Even if the interment is understandable the cornification of property and forced deportations after War are not Why Are the Canadians trying to cover the Damage they’ve don’t to Japanese? • Comparing themselves to natsies (show that they don’t put fences or any restrictions) • Don’t like how Japanese are getting a free pass where the camps are providing them with the financial aid Book: Obasan 1. What was "the Pool" and what were conditions like there? • A place where Japanese people were taken like (jail) where they weren’t able to shower, or eat and had dirty insects • They were treated worse than animals 2. Why is the phrase "grinning and happy" ironic? • In Alberta, Naomi sees a picture in the beach farm • that’s the headline of Grinning and happy and ironic is because in reality their not really happy 3. What happened to Naomi's mother? • From Aunt Emily’s diary where she writes letter, Naomi learns that her mother, who had been in Japan before the bombing of Pearl Harbor, was severely injured by the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki • a finding which changes her perspective of the 'War in the Pacific', and rekindles the heartbreak she experienced as a child (she begins to understand how the War affects her family) THEMES: Past  “crimes of history…can stay in history…shouldn’t we turn the page and move on?
More Less

Related notes for HUMA 1200

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit