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Lecture

16lecture1780batmanfilm09SU.pdf

9 Pages
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Department
Humanities
Course Code
HUMA 1780
Professor
Elicia Clements

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Lecture 16  1 School of Arts and Letters  Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies  Summer 2009  AK/HUMA 1780 6.0A Stories in Diverse Media    Announcements:  ♦ Please note: Distance Education is now housed in the eServices Office (eSO), Faculty  of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies (LA&PS). They remain in the same location,  Suite 2120, TEL Building, and the phone number is still 416‐736‐5831, but all the  previous Atkinson Distance Education Web site links are no longer publicly linked or  accessible via the LA&PS Web site. http://www.yorku.ca/laps/   ♦ Here is the new link for the Distance Education Web site:   http://www.yorku.ca/laps/disted/   ♦ Also, there is a new protocol for uploading assignments (it isn't very different so  don't fret, but you will need to review this for next week's assignment submission). I  will copy it below. You can access Assignment Upload through the Distance  Education Web site at:  http://www.yorku.ca/laps/disted/coversheetweb.htm   ♦ This means that OCTES is no longer the contact for help. Instead, please use the  [email protected] email if you have technical difficulties uploading your assignment.  ♦ Thank you for your patience. The Distance Education services are in transition this  summer so I apologize for the bumps we've encountered along the way this term.    Lecture 16  2 Procedure for Submitting Assignments On-line There is an ONLINE procedure for students to submit assignments to the eServices Office. Students are to submit their assignments to the Assignment Upload Web site . Please refer to the steps below. How do I submit assignments? Step 1: Go to: http://www.yorku.ca/laps/disted/coversheetweb.htm The recommended browser to access this site is Internet Explorer 6.0 Step 2: Login to the system with your York U e-mail account user id and your student number as your password. Your user id is the first part of your York Student E-mail account. Example: UDER ID (e.g. [email protected]): joes STUDENT NUMBER: 909200900 (with no spaces) Step 3: Choose your course from the list of your enrolled distance courses Step 4: Upload your assignment (attach file) and fill out the required Course Assignment Cover Form Students can upload by simply attaching t heir assignment files from the detailed instructions on the Web site. If you wish to resubmit before the assignment deadline we will print your most recent submission. Step 5: Submit and keep a print out copy of your confirmation of submission Some final suggestions: • On every page of your assignment you should note your name, student # and page #. •Your assignment should be submitted by the due date otherwise it will be marked late. • Always keep a back up copy of your assignment file. Experiencing difficulties when submitting your assignment online? If you are experiencing any technical difficulties on your end, please read “problems with uploading” noted below. If you cannot resolve yourproblem please call the eServices Office at 416- 736-5831 immediately. If you experience diffi culties outside of regular business hours than you may e-mail your assignment to the eSO at: [email protected] or fax it to 416. 736-5637 and include a note as to why you could not subm it your assignment via the online Web site. Remember to include your name, student number, course ID and assignment number in your e- mail. Your e-mail will be your cover sheet which includes the daand time you sent the e-mail. Please make sure you s ubmit your assignment ON TIME , otherwise you will have marks deducted for lateness. PROBLEMS WITH UPLOADING • Macintosh Computers are not supported. Students have to use a Windows ’98 or a better Operating System. • Students cannot use Netscape/Mozilla Firefox or any other web browsers. Use Internet Explorer 6.0 or better (Recommended Version – Internet Explorer 7.0) Lecture 16  3 • There should be no spaces in the filename of the assignment. To rename file, open assignment in program used to create assignment e.g. Microsoft Word and then click on ‘Save As’ – put in a new name without spaces. You cannot rename/remove space when attaching the file in the upload web site. Ensure that your file name is not more than 16 characters long. Save the file to your desktop. Sign in to Assignment Upload in Internet Explorer and proceed to submit your assignment. • User Id – Only the first part of York U e-mail. • Do not attach path when attaching file. • Larger files will take longer to attach. • Attachments should be in Word or Excel. • Students cannot submit a Zip File – should re-submit with multiple attachments. • Remove pop up blockers What happens after you submit your assignment? The eServices Office will print hard copies off all submissions and place them in the course mailbox at eSO for your instructor to pick up. Once the assignments are graded and returned to eSO by the instructor, the assignments are then scanned and e-mailed back to students via their York U e-mail accounts. Lecture 16  4 When Character and Theme Overtake Plot: Chris Nolan's The Dark Knight  For our comparison to the film, we will explore further some of the issues we  touched on last day—namely, Methods of Narration and Heroes and Anti‐Heroes—so  that we can weigh these two over‐arching concepts about narrative and character  against Chris Nolan’s The Dark Knight. But first, of course, I must apologize for the typo  in the syllabus! The film you will be viewing is the 2008 version starring Christian Bale as  Batman, Heath Ledger as The Joker, Aaron Eckhart as Two Face, Gary Oldman as  Commissioner Gordon, and Maggie Gyllenhaal as Assistant DA Rachel Dawes. It is simply  called The Dark Knight, not The Dark Knight Returns as in the title of the graphic novel.  Christopher Nolan not only directed the film (billed as the sequel to his earlier movie  Batman Begins, 2005) but he also co‐wrote the screenplay with his brother Jonathan  Nolan, so he is clearly very involved in how the 2008 version was put together in terms  of our story elements such as the plot, the characters, and the setting.   But significantly, what this last grouping in Module 2: From Monsters to Heroes  to Monsters reveals is what happens when character (and star power) overtake plot.  Instead of a few changes in narrative events (Salomé dies at the end of Oscar Wilde’s  play, for example) or a new name and culture for a character who behaves quite similar  to another (Pygmalion and Rahul), or even a change in setting (O Brother, Where Art  Thou? is set in the Southern US during the Depression Era), the commonality linking this  adaption of the Batman story is primarily the eponymous hero. Additionally, the Batman  film franchise shows us in very contemporary terms the weight and effectiveness of  cultural currency.   Lecture 16  5 In 1986, Frank Miller and Lynn Varley (the artist and designer) published the  expensive, glossy, four‐volume graphic novel (Batman: The Dark Knight Returns) in  which they re‐imagined the Caped Crusader as an aging and bitter vigilante who fights  criminals in a gritty and decaying Gotham city. The boldness of Miller’s storyline and  cartooning made it an immediate sensation among comic book fans. Its astonishing  success fuelled the decision made by Warner Brothers to make the first Batman movie  in 1989. The relation between the Batman franchise and the graphic novel of the 1980s  has become more financial than literary. The success of Miller’s graphic novel in  mainstream booksellers indicated a market that went far beyond the comic collector.  Batman: The Dark Knight Returns is, therefore, one of the first examples of a graphic  novel that appeals to a wider audience. The Warner Brothers executives quickly
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