Class Notes (835,342)
Canada (509,116)
York University (35,229)
POLS 3561 (21)
Khooyashar (20)
Lecture 9

POLS 3651- Lecture 9.docx

4 Pages
60 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLS 3561
Professor
Khooyashar
Semester
Fall

Description
POLS 3651/ MIST 3651  November 18 , 2013  Lecture 9 – Week 11 Law, Federalism and Rights  Forms of government in the world are either Federal or Unitary.  • What is the purpose of having a federal system of government? What purpose does it serve?   ▯Division of Power, the power is divided between the federal and provincial government in Canada.  Why are the powers divided in the different levels? What are they trying to achieve?  “Whether Federalism promotes or undermines rights”?   ▯Diversity is a key component in Federalism  What is Federalism?  • Federalism is about unity and diversity • Federalism accommodates differences.  • Federal systems provide a political means for the coordination of an underlying federal society.  • The Significance of Federalism:  • The significance of federalism becomes more evident in the area of globalization, because we are  moving from a systematic government to a more global governance.  • Emerging democracies in Europe and elsewhere currently attempting to design constitutions that  combine effective government, recognition of ethnic diversity within.  Justification:  • They say federalism advances liberty and equality.  • Justice O’Connor: One of the constitution’s protections of liberty  “as the separation of the independent  branches of the federal government serves to prevent excessive power in any one branch and to help  keep balance of power in the states”. Ambivalences:  • Mainly focused on the democracy part of federalism not the liberty part  • There is an inherent tension between federalism and democracy   ▯this ambivalence has two dimensions  ­ Rule of law:  ­   ▯ • Federalism constrains majorities  ▯undemocratic  • However, constraints may be vital in protecting individual rights.  Origins and Historical Evolution of Canada:  • First encounters: Aboriginals and Europeans  (French colonizers and English Colonizers Vs.  Aboriginals)  • French and English: Accommodating Difference  • Confederation – 1867   ▯Prior to 1867 Britain tried to maintain power and authority over Canada.  ▯Was about the coming together of colonies in this land for economic and political security and it was  also about accommodating French and English differences.  • Development – 1949  • Independence – 1982? ­ Full independence of Canada was achieved through two documents.   ▯The charter of Rights and Freedoms is about the protection of individual rights from the tyranny of the  state   ▯The Amending Formulas: five amending formulas for the first time, advising, modifying and amending   the Canadian constitution.  Constitutional Structure:  • Two Key Constitutional Documents   ▯Constitution Act, 1867   ▯Constitution Act, 1982 (Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Amending Formulas and it is about  separation)  • Continuing Constitutional debate  • Constitutional Principles:  ▯in 1998 Supreme Court of Canada identified these Constitutional Principles: Democracy,  Constitutionalism, Rule of Law, Federalism, and Respect for Minorities.  • One Constitution in Canada, two parts (Constitutional act of 1867 and 1982)  • Unwritten Canadian Constitution: Tradition (these are inherited from government from Britain)  Logic of Division of Powers?  ▯  Logic of division of power is very broad   ▯Provinces are mainly responsible for social and cultural matters, education, welfare, healthcare, infrastructure,  implementation of federal economic policies, and promotion of economic development.   ▯There is this concept of legal studies in Canada: Judicial Review. This is the review of the actions of the  government. This is one of the main jobs of the Supreme Court of Canada  ­ Review has to do with government politics and acts passed by government  ­ Courts interpret the powers of both provincial and federal governments.   ▯Jurisdiction of Federal: National building, trade, commerce, banking, responsibility for social security,  pension, unemployment, national security, criminal law.  Constitutional role of the courts: • While the Constitution sets out the basic rules of Canada
More Less

Related notes for POLS 3561

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit