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Lecture 8

BSNS105 Lecture Notes - Lecture 8: Work Unit, Myers–Briggs Type Indicator, Shift Work

22 pages52 viewsSummer 2013

Department
Business Studies
Course Code
BSNS105
Professor
Diane Ruwhiu
Lecture
8

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Lecture 8 & 9: Managing People Employing effective human resources Chapter 12
Key Focuses of this lecture:
- Understand the role of Human Resource Management within organisations.
- Create an awareness of the regulatory environment in which HRM operates.
- Understand the 3 phases of the employment relationship (acquisition, maintenance and
termination).
- Attracting an Effective Workforce
1. What is Human Resource Management?
Human: relating to, or characteristic of humankind
Resources: a stock or supply of money, materials, staff, and other assets that can be drawn on (by
a person or organization) in order to function effectively;
* Definition 1: very narrow sense, because employees also have goals
Those management functions concerned with attracting, maintaining and developing people in
the employment relationship
* Definition 2: what functional aspects does it cover?
The processes and activities aimed at utilising all employees to achieve organisational goals
* HRM happens in every organisation; who does it and how it gets done is often a function of the
size of the firm and the ideology of its management; but whether it is a dedicated HR function or
not, people get recruited, they need to do their jobs and they might need training, and get paid
and pay. Employment relationships also come to an end at some time; whether its voluntary or
involuntary, its a part of HRM people management process.
* Everyone experiences HRM, if not necessarily practice it, then it is important to know your rights,
and understand how things are supposed to work; acquiring this knowledge helps the
understanding of why we do things the way we do in organisations and where things are going
wrong, so you don’t get caught up in a costly mistake (whether this is being dragged through a
personal grievance, or simply hiring a useful person and having to get rid of them). The people
you employ, the way they do their job, i.e. perform, are crucial determinants of firm performance
they are crucial to a firm’s competitive advantage.
What HRM looks like in an organisation
What HRM looks like in an organisation is dependent on organisational size; all organisations do
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HR, but do they have a dedicated HR person fulfilling this role? No.
- 97% of business in NZ is small (19 or fewer staff), but most of the working labour force
employed is the 3% (medium to large organisations). Given that 97 percent of all
enterprises in New Zealand employ 19 or fewer staff, SMEs need to be heard.
- For an organisation to have a dedicated HR function/person; ratio: 90employees/1HR staff
- 90 x 75 HR staff = 6750 but the university has around 3000 staff ratio is more 1:40
Organisation Size
HR Presence
Sample Organisation
Small (less than 100)
No Dept manager / owner role
Strictly Coffee Company
Medium (100 500)
2 3 Staff
Port Otago
Large (500+)
10+ staff (75 including H&S)
University of Otago
Multi-national (large based
across many countries)
Complex/Multiple layers
(host/home country)
McDonalds
Large Organisation; Role of HRM
FUNCTIONAL DELIVERY
OF CORE BUSINESS
RESEARCH/TEACHING
SERVICE -
SUPPORT
Some specialist and some Jack of all trades
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HRM Practitioner Roles
- Generalist Jack of all trades’ (R&S/PM/T&D/H&S)
- Specialist…high levels of knowledge (remuneration)
- Consultant Expertise outsourced
- Recruitment examples Seek.co.nz or Select Personnel or Westaff;
- Payroll/Rewards examples “Smart Payroll” or “Keylink Payroll Services
How HRM has evolved
* Stage one: 1900-1940s; Welfare and Administration
HRM has changed considerably over the past 100 years or so; major concerns: welfare of the
workers and controlling the workforce and their activities these concerns sit alongside of the
introduction of scientific management and the desire to control the worker
- General welfare benevolent/paternalistic
- Canteen operation
- Work injuries and accidents…beginning of H&S
- Adjusting’ individual difficulties (tea & sympathy)
- Controlling absenteeism
- No dedicated/specific role
* Stage two: 1940s-1970s; Personnel Management emerged
Nature of the environment was changing and so too did people management- started to gain
some credibility. Grained credibility as an actual role within organisations and along with that men
started to fill these roles. Unions becoming more powerful at this stage; environment more
competitive needed someone to negotiate with the unions
- Specialised activities appeared (record keeping - payroll, absenteeism)
- Centralised the people management (HR) activities
- Union negotiations/involvement; partly a file clerk's job, partly a housekeeping job, partly
a social worker's job, partly firefighting to head off union trouble or settle it - Drucker
-
… a bunch of drones whose apparent missions in life were to create paperwork, recruit
secretaries who couldn’t type and issue memos whose impertinence was only exceeded by
their irrelevance harmless chaps spent their careers worshipping files, arranging company
picnics and generally accomplishing nothing whatsoever of fundamental importance”
Rudman
. The lack of respect saw the Personnel Management function re-brand itself.
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