Class Notes (837,435)
United States (325,029)
Boston College (3,565)
Philosophy (307)
PHIL 1070 (119)
Lecture

10-17-13.docx

5 Pages
73 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 1070
Professor
Robert Mc Gill
Semester
Fall

Description
Poly Sci 10/16/2013 Marx,  Communist Manifesto Sought to expose man’s non­rational side. Argument: If people have hidden sides and ways of thinking then how can we have democracy considering  they cannot be expected to understand/vote on policy or represent the citizenry. On surface: People appear to exercise free will and logical thinking, but in reality when you look below the  surface (Gnostics), there are irresistible surfaces that we don’t understand and that throw us about and  force us to do things that if we were in fact logical and rational we wouldn’t do. Some of those things clearly  go against our interests. Marx  argues that they’re economic forces. Freud  argues they’re society/civilization forces. In every way, all we do/think/say/etc. is predetermined. Not individuals, part of a whole sea of people within a civilization b/c we are predetermined beings and are  100% unable to change it unless you understand it, like Marx, in which case you have a revolution. Freud: Society is the death of you because people need to be tamed/house­broken like wild animals to be  able to survive in it. Takes away all of your rights and freedoms. Society & government are the primary source of misery in the human race. Man is aggressive but you can’t be in society so it goes against our nature. Both: Religion/ethics/morality is mass delusion Marx calls it the opiate of the masses .” Contrary to Both: Each person personally responsible for our actions because we committed them with free  will. Marx and Freud argue none of us are individually responsible oanything . There are no absolutes of time or space, good or bad, of knowledge, and, above all, of value. Einstein’s Theory of Relativity played strongly into moral relativity Marx Born in 1818­1883 Wrote Manifesto  in 1848 at request of German Worker’s Club. Caused much upheaval in Europe. Collaborated with German businessman who bankrolled his work. Greatest and most well­known of socialism philosophers. Humanist and passionate believer in social justice. Saw the effect of poor industrial revolution conditions and spent his life figuring out how they got to those  conditions and how to get ou
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 1070

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit