Class Notes (943,926)
US (364,904)
TAMU (5,201)
WFSC (21)
WFSC 301 (19)
Lecture 17

WFSC 301 Lecture 17: Lecture 17 Mycoplasma
Premium

2 Pages
19 Views

Department
Wildlife & Fisheries Sci.
Course Code
WFSC 301
Professor
Walter Cook

This preview shows half of the first page. Sign up to view the full 2 pages of the document.
Tuesday, March 28, 2017 at 1400 PM
Lecture 17: Mycoplasma
Etiologic Agent: Mycoplasma agassizii and Mycoplasma testudineum
Gram negative
Can survive without oxygen
Lacks cell wall
- Unaffected by common antibiotics such as penicillin
Also known as Upper respiratory tract disease
History:
Isolated from free ranging desert tortoises in the mojave desert,
Cali
Hosts: Only found in tortoises
Likely that all species of tortoises are susceptible
Not zoonotic
Geographic Distribution
Found in captive and wild tortoises in Europe + England and US
Signs:
Develops as early as 2 weeks after infection
White crust around nse
bubbles out of nose
whistling and gurgling sounds
mouth breathing
loss of appeitite
For Upper respiratory tract disease:
Nasal discharge
puffy eyelids
dullness to skin
Gross Lesions:
No obvious gross lesions
Transmission
horizontal transmission via direct contact with the same species or
through contaminated surface (fomite transmission)
Vertical transmission hasn’t been documented but hasn’t been
ruled out as a method of transmission
Environmental transmission in the wild is unlikely
Aerosol transmission is possible
Diagnosis:
• ELISA
- uses serum or plasma, no whole blood
- detects M. agassizii antibodies
Western Blot
- Plasma
- Distinguishes between natural and acquired M. agassizii
antibodies
Culture/PCR testing
- Culture media and nasal samples
- High specificity and rapid detection
- Downside is that it may not detect closeley related strains of
infection
Treatment:
Treated with antibiotics: enrofloxacin - through nostrils
No cure -> tortoises are lifetime carriers
Prevention and control
Quarantine all new arrivals for at least 6 months
Limit number of tortoises in an area to limit exposure to infection
Do not release infected tortoises into the wild
If a handler has been in a positive pen they must disinfect or
remove clothing before going into a negative pen

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
• horizontal transmission via direct contact with the same species or through contaminated surface (fomite transmission) • Vertical transmission hasn’t been documented but hasn’t been ruled out as a method of transmission • Environmental transmission in the wild is unlikely • Aerosol transmission is possible Diagnosis: • ELISA - uses serum or plasma, no whole blood - detects M. agassizii antibodies • Western Blot - Plasma - Distinguishes between natural and acquired M. agassizii antibodies • Culture/PCR testing - Culture media and nasal samples - High specificity and rapid detection - Downside is that it may not detect closeley related strains of infection Treatment: • Treated with antibiotics: enrofloxacin - through nostrils • No cure -> tortoises are lifetime carriers Prevention and control • Quarantine all new arrivals for at least 6 months • Limit number of tortoises in an area to limit exposure to infection • Do not release infected tortoises into the wild • If a handler has been in a positive pen they must disinfect or remove clothing before going into a negative pen
More Less
Unlock Document


Only half of the first page are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit