Class Notes (836,277)
United States (324,407)
Psychology (193)
PSY-0001 (107)
Lecture

Sensation.docx
Premium

4 Pages
47 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY-0001
Professor
Yvonne Wakeford
Semester
Fall

Description
Sensation The cognitive perspective ­ Cognitive psychology views the mind/brain as an information processor ­ Cognition: a set of computations performed on representations o Described as precisely as possible by cognitive theories  Allows us to make explicit predictions Themes for cognitive lectures ­ Cognition is active, not passive ­ Bottom­up (driven by stimuli) vs. top­down (driven by knowledge) processing ­ Context matters Overview for today ­ Definition of sensation ­ Transduction and coding ­ Cortical organization ­ Active processing Sensation and Perception ­ Sensation: bringing information from outside world to the brain o Raw data ­ Perception: selection, organization and interpretation of sensory information o Interpretation ­ Sensation is mediated o We do not have direct perception of objects  Receive information about objects indirectly (ex. through light, sound  waves)  Information further affected by the properties of the sensory system ­ Sensation is limited o Electromagnetic spectrum ­ Sensation o Sensory organs receive energy from or are otherwise stimulated by the  environment  Eyes—light energy  Ears—acoustic energy  Skin—mechanical energy and heat  Tongue—molecular stimulation  Nose—molecular stimulation  Inner ear, joints—Mechanical energy from stretching o Sensory receptors convert energy into neural signals that are sent to the brain ­ Measuring sensation o Absolute threshold  The smallest detectable level of a stimulus  Vision: a candle 30 miles away in complete darkness (see textbook) o Just noticeable difference (JND): the smallest change in intensity of a stimulus  If, when holding an object of 100 grams, it is necessary to hold an object  of 110 grams to detect a difference in weight  The JND is 10 grams o Weber’s Law  Describes the relationship between intensity and a JND  Rather than being constant, JNDs vary as a proportion of the intensity • Ex. One might not detect a difference in weight between 200 and  210 grams, but would distinct 200 vs. 220 grams  The proportion between the change in intensity and the baseline intensity  is constant Transduction & Coding ­ Transduction: converting a stimulus into neural signals ­ Coding: the way information is encoded in neural signals Auditory Transduction ­ Pressure waves cause basilar membrane to deform ­ Movement mechanically triggers action potentials in specialized neurons Auditory Coding ­ Frequency Theory o Frequency is encoded by the rate of neural firing o Neurons fire once per cycle  100 Hz tone = 100 action potentials per second o Problem: limited by refractory period of the axon  Upper limit: 1000 Hz (maybe 4000)  But we can hear tones up to 20,000 Hz! ­ Place Theory o Frequency is encoded by the location of neural firing o Different neurons in the inner ear code for different frequencies (von Helmholtz) o Problem: low­frequency sounds move entire Basilar membrane ­ Current The
More Less

Related notes for PSY-0001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit