Class Notes (836,135)
United States (324,357)
Psychology (312)
PSY 101 (146)
Lecture

Psychology 101 Lecture 2.6.14 - Research cont. and Behavior

4 Pages
55 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 101
Professor
Professor Berg
Semester
Spring

Description
PSY101 – Lecture 2.6.14 Correlational Methods  Researchers have interest in variable relationships that cannot be manipulated (due to  ethics, ability) in a lab; in these cases we turn to correlational methods  Ex. Job satisfaction vs. presence of anxiety; presence of child abuse vs.  graduation rate; health status vs. psychological outlook  Correlation coefficient: correlations are determined to a precise degree presented as  statistical values between +­ 1  ­positive: both variables increase  ­negative: one variable increases as one decreases  ­researchers describe non­perfect correlation strength as weakly vs. strongly correlated,  and directionality as positively vs. negatively correlated  ­stronger correlations (close to max of +­1) indicate that predictions will be more  accurate about one variable based on the status of the second variable  Advantages:  ­investigate behavior by observing natural occurrence of events  ­allows researchers to analyze relationships between variables that cannot (or will not) be  manipulated in a lab  ­participants are not aware of being monitored, and are less likely to compromise study  integrity with bias  Disadvantages: ­correlation does not equal causation – does not allow us to make the claim about which  variable effected the other  ­have to be careful about confounding factors influencing interpreted data – other things  occurring at the same time that could be playing a role  ­provide limited conclusions (“We observed an increase in the presence of Variable 1  when there was a decrease in presence of Variable 2” – not saying much)  Researchers aim to generate findings that are reliable and valid   Reliability: consistent, dependable data that results from experimentation ­reliable results are those that are repeated under similar conditions at different  times  – reliable tools for measuring are those that yield non­significantly different  results when the state of the subject has not changed  Validity: testing that accurately measures the variable that it has been designed to  measure – gauged based on how well the data allows us to predict future behavior  ­if a researcher can generalize findings from experiment to broader circumstances  in real world, then findings have mark of validity  Self­Report Measures In order to investigate internal psychological states that cannot be observed directly  (beliefs, feelings, wishes), researchers rely on self­report measures  ­verbal responses to questions posed  ­questions delivered in questionnaire or interview setting  Advantages: ­can investigate psychological states that are not amenable to lab measurement  ­participant’s own observation and reports  Disadvantages: ­cannot be done with certain subjects (pre­verbal children, nonhuman animals) ­may not be reliable or valid (participant may misinterpret question, lie, have vague  memory of event, etc.) ­questioner biases may influence the way the questions are posed  Behavioral Measures and Observations  Researchers use behavioral measures to study observable, overt actions  ­may be recordable actions or reactions  ­does not include self­reported behavior  direct observations: can be done in the lab or in the field; seek to investigate clearly  visible and easily recorded behavior (crying, laughing, sweating)  naturalistic observations: researchers record behavior non­obtrusively – researchers  seek to view behavior as it naturally occurs  Case Studies ­Used when the focus is to analyze a single individual or small group – captures the  reflection of an individual that is difficult to isolate in larger groups ­Can sometimes yield useful insights into general human experience  Ethical Issues in Human and Animal Research  ­Review boards at sites of resea
More Less

Related notes for PSY 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit