Class Notes (834,026)
United States (323,604)
Psychology (312)
PSY 101 (146)
Lecture

Social Processes.docx

8 Pages
65 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 101
Professor
Professor Berg
Semester
Spring

Description
Social Processes 05/01/2014 Attribution ­Social psychologists are interested in understanding the ways perceivers use info to generate causal  explanations of events ­Covariation model  We notice consistencies (statistical learning) People attribute behavior to a causal factor if they notice the factor was present at the time of event and  absent when event did not occur Ex. Your friend is an all­star lacrosse athlete. He maintains consistent routine prior to each  game. Your friend had a poor night of sleep that was followed by poor game the next day. He  attributes some aspect of sleeping poorly to outcome in his game performance. ­Perceivers often have a choice when determining the cause of observed behavior; we can attribute the  behavior to dispositional factors (people involved), situational factors (environment) or both. ­Fundamental attribution error FAE reflects the tendency of observers to underestimate the influence of situational factors on a persons  behavior and to overestimate the influence of dispositional factors Making the situation for the person ­Social psychologists are also interested in understanding how people interact factors involved in their own  successes and failures ­Self serving bias is an attributional bias that leads people to take credit for their successes and to reject or  deny responsibility for their failures. Ex. I did well on Jeopardy because I am intellectually gifted. Expectations of Future Events ­Expectations can shape the way an individual interprets reality, but they can also shape the way reality  unfolds. ­Self­fulfilling prophecies Predictions about future events that modify current outcome of behavior Behaviors produced are consistent with predictions and facilitate them becoming reality. False Hope Syndrome ­A cycle of repeated failure in self­improvement due to unrealistic ideas about aspects of self­change ­4 components 1. Speed Believe self change will occur over an unrealistically short period of time. Assume failure when change does not occur fast enough 2. Ease Unrealistic expectations about the difficulty of change Some changes to self require more than the will to do it. 3. Amount Unrealistic expectations about how much change is likely ( or even possible) Accomplishment may come in smaller steps than what it take to motivate. 4. Rewards Unrealistic expectations for benefits of change  Ex. People dieting expect to lose weight but some also expect romance, job, an overall conversion of  identity. Etc. Prejudice ­Prejudice is a LEARNED attitude toward a person or group of individuals ­Attitudes may include or be accompanied by: Negative affect (dislike or fear) Negative beliefs (stereotypes are generalizations in which characteristics are assume to be true about all  members of a target group) Behavioral position to avoid, control, dominate, or eliminate the presence of a target or things affiliated with  a target Bigotry or hateful speech Responsibility ­With freedom comes responsibility Knowledge that one is bound to act in a particular situation Context of the situation can influence whether people recognize their responsibility. ­In situations with many bystanders, there may be a diffusion of responsibility. Tendency of people to be less likely to help a stranger in need if there are other people present at the  scene. Increased number of bystanders in an emergency situation, decrease responsibility any one of the  bystanders feels to help. False Consensus Effect ­Tendency for observers to overestimate the degree to which everybody else thinks or acts  Ex. It is okay to steal food f
More Less

Related notes for PSY 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit