Lec 26.docx

4 Pages
91 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHILOS 5
Professor
Daniel Pilchman
Semester
Winter

Description
Food Labels Some Moral Problems • Ethical treatment of animals o Animals are often raised in small, unhealthy, and dangerous “factory  farms” only to be slaughtered o Not only domesticated animals are harmed by our food system, but wild  animals are endangered as well o Growing demand for food has forced farmers to convert natural habitat to  farmland, displacing animals from their homes and reducing biodiversity • Food and food production o CAFOs, despite the promise of profit, actually reduce the quality of life  and wealth in rural communities o The use of chemical pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers poses health  risks when eaten by consumers or allowed to filter into drinking water o Chemicals pose even more direct health threats to farm workers who  breathe and touch them directly o Similar issues to GMOs and kinds of health concerns some geneticists  have about their use and consumption o Government policy, like subsidies, can impact food insecurity and health  at home, as well as poverty and job displacement abroad Ethics of Consumption • On the side of food production and policy, we may never be directly involved  with • Consumers play an essential role in the food system because their choices  determine what foods will be profitable and worth producing • Consumers can “vote with their folks”, Pollan and Nestle both say, by letting the  moral issues we have discussed influence the choices they make in the  supermarket • Consumers can develop an “ethics of consumption”: a set of rules about the kinds  of foods and food production methods that they will support with their purchases Ethics, Consumption, and Food Labels • In order for people to develop their own ethics of consumption, they need at least  two things: • 1. People need to have some understanding of the kinds of moral issues that are  raised by food • 2. People need some indication of which foods help or worsen which moral  problem • We have developed a sophisticated system of labels that link designated foods to  moral issues that people care about The Nutrition Label • Became mandatory in 1990, previously voluntary • Notoriously difficult to read • Social stigma attached to being a “label reader” or “calorie counter” Country of Origin • Many consumers worry about where their foods come from • Because they object to the agricultural practices in other countries, and do not  want to support them by buying their products • For “locovores” (people who prefer local foods), another worry is that shipping  foods from distant countries increases their “carbon footprint” • In 2009, US food distributors were forced to start labeling meats and produce with  Country of Origin Labels: COOL • Food distributors fought COOL for many years, arguing that it would be  prohibitively expensive to track where food came from, and that consumers do  not actually care All Natural • “Natural” label has become a central marketing tool, specifically for meats • The name invokes many of the same ideas that the word “organic” does, and  many consumers mistakenly assume that these man more or less the same thing • There is not just one meaning: USDA, FDA, ATF all have different definitions for  “natural” and “all natural”  • USDA says, “there are no standards
More Less

Related notes for PHILOS 5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit