Moral Nihilism and The Observation Argument

3 Pages
121 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 160
Professor
Christopher Meacham
Semester
Fall

Description
Moral Nihilism Positive Moral Claim (PMC): Any claim of the form "You should 'X'" & "You shouldn't  'X'" Question: Are PMCs factive? • If we say no, then we have a Non­Factivism position 1 Ex) Emotivism • If we say yes, then we can ask a second question: 1  Are positive moral claims relative  Are they true or false relative to something? 1 If we say no, positive moral claims aren't relative­ relativism 1 Ex) Cultural Relativism 2 If we say yes­ we can ask a third question 1 Are any positive moral claims true? Are positive moral claims  ever true? 1 If we say no, we are led to the view of Moral Nihilism­  all positive moral claims are false (more objective) 2 If we say yes, we are led to Moral Objectivism­ the view  that some positive moral claims are 1) factive, 2)  non­relative, and 3) true Are there true non­relative positive moral claims? Ex) Some things we know exist because we observe them. We interact with these things to observe other things, such as a microscope of bacteria.  Thus, we think that these other things exist too. However, All of the things that we think exist play a role in what we observe.  What are the things that make positive moral claims true? Moral Truthmakers: Things that make PMCs true      What role do those play in explaining what we observe?      Do these things play a role in explaining what we observe? They don't. We shouldn't  think this. ­This is the intuitive idea Key principle in this argument is the: The Observation Argument The Observation Principle: You should only believe in things which: • a) appear in the best overall explanation of what we observe                                                   OR • b) Can be characterized in terms of things which appear in this best explanation Ex) Electrons      Should we believe that electrons exist according to the observation principle?       1) Do electrons appear in the best overall explanation of what we observe?            a) Yes. So we should think they exist.  Ex) Chairs           a) No. Electron chair­shaped things           b) Yes. In terms of those things­ a bunch of matter are bound together to make this. Ex) Witches           a) No.           b) No.      We shouldn't think that witches exist.  Moral Truthmakers: Just like witches. Won't appear... (a) can't characterize… (b)­ so we  shouldn't believe this can exist. The Observation Argument:  P1. The observation Principle. P2. Moral truth makers don't satisfy clause A. They don't appear in the best explan
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 160

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit