ANTH100

Introduction to Anthropology

University of Waterloo

Anthropology aims at understanding what it is to be human and to examine how humanity is manifested in the diversity of cultures and societies across time and space. This course gives the student an overview of the breadth of anthropology and orients them toward thinking anthropologically in our shared worlds.
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24HR Notes for ANTH100

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Goetz Hoeppe

ANTH100 Syllabus for Goetz Hoeppe — Fall 2018

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1
University*of*Waterloo*
Department*of*Anthropology*
ANTH*100:*Introduction*to*Anthropology*
Fall*2018*
Monday,*Wednesday*&*Friday,*10:30*–*11:20*am,*SJ2*1004*
Instructor*and*TA*Information*
Professor: tz Hoeppe, PhD Teaching Assistant: Ben Scher
Office: PAS 2018 Office: PAS 2006
Office Phone: (519) 888-4567, ext. 32553
Office Hours: Tuesday 1 – 3 pm and Office Hours: Friday, 9 10 am, by
Wednesday 1 - 2 pm and by appointment appointment
Email: ghoeppe@uwaterloo.ca Email: bdscher@uwaterloo.ca
(please put “ANTH100” in subject line)
Course*Website: https://learn.uwaterloo.ca/
Course*Description*
This course is a general introduction to anthropology, the study of the human condition past
and present. We examine the four sub-fields of anthropology: biological anthropology (the
study of human evolution, variation and biocultural adaptation), archaeology (the study of past
human material culture), linguistic anthropology (the sociocultural study of language), and
sociocultural anthropology (the study of human society and culture). The course focuses on
(1) understanding humans as biocultural beings, on (2) how, throughout history, humans have
transformed themselves and their livelihood through techniques and technologies, as well as
on (3) how the perspective of anthropology helps making sense of contemporary, often global,
social and cultural issues.
Course*Goals*and*Learning*Outcomes*
Gain an understanding of the four subfields of anthropology and how their combination
allows unique insights into the human condition.
• Gain an understanding of the methods used by anthropologists to study ancient peoples and
human societies across space and time.
• Be familiar with basic elements of anthropological thought about culture, society, kinship,
language, the economy, politics, ethnic conflict and religion.
• Articulate how an anthropological perspective helps to make sense of contemporary cultural
and social issues, many of which are global in scope.
Required*Texts*
William A. Haviland, Harald E.L. Prins, Dana Walrath and Bunny McBride (2015). The Essence of
Anthropology. Fourth Edition. Boston, MA: Cengage Publication.
(Please note that this book is available at the UW bookstore at a greatly reduced price.)
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Assessment*
Evaluation
Date of Evaluation (if known)
Weighting
Online open-book quiz 1 (on syllabus)
Online open-book quiz 2
Online open-book quiz 3
Midterm exam
Online open-book quiz 4
Online open-book quiz 5
Final exam
September 10
September 21
October 5
October 19 (in class)
November 9
November 23
in the final exam period
1%
6%
6%
30%
6%
6%
45%
Total
100%
Material*covered*in*each*exam*and*quiz**
Date
Exam or quiz
Contents covered
Sep 10
Online open-book quiz 1
This syllabus
Sep 21
Online open-book quiz 2
Textbook chapters 1 – 3
Oct 5
Online open-book quiz 3
Textbook chapters 4 – 6
Oct 19
Midterm exam
Lectures and
textbook chapters 1 – 7
Nov 9
Online open-book quiz 4
Textbook chapters 8 11
Nov 23
Online open-book quiz 5
Textbook chapters 12 14
Final Exam
period
Final exam
Lectures from October 22 onwards and
textbook chapters 8 16
Note: Online quizzes will be open for your completion for 24 hours, from 12 noon of the quiz
date mentioned until 12 noon of the following day.
Note*on*the*contents*of*the*course*and*the*exams*
Please note that while the course outline follows the textbook, the course lectures focus on the
development of key concepts and their application. In order to illustrate these I also use
materials not included in the textbook.
The online open-book quizzes will include questions on specific details elaborated in the
textbook.
The midterm and final exams will focus on the course lectures and discussions, which contain
material and examples not covered in the textbook, and which may not always be included on
the slides that I shall post on our LEARN site. Regular attendance is key to success in this course.
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Course*Outline*
Week
Date
Topic
Chapters from
Textbook
1
Sep 7
Introduction to the Course
Sep 10
Online open-book quiz 1
2
Sep 10 & 12
Sep 14
Thinking and Doing Anthropology
Biology, Genetics, and Evolution
1
2
3
Sep 17 & 19
Sep 21
Biology, Genetics, and Evolution
Living Primates
2
3
Sep 21
Online open-book quiz 2
4
Sep 24, 26 & 28
Human Evolution
4
5
Oct 1, 3 & 5
The Neolithic Revolution
The Emergence of Cities and States
5
6
Oct 5
Online open-book quiz 3
6
Oct 8 & 10
Oct 12
Fall break (no class)
The Invention of Writing
7
Oct 15 and 17
Oct 19
Modern Human Diversity: Race and Racism
MIDTERM EXAM
7
8
Oct 22, 24, 26
The Characteristics of Culture
8
9
Oct 29, 31, Nov 2
Language and Communication
Social identity, Personality, and Gender
9
10
10
Nov 5, 7, 9
Subsistence and Exchange
11
Nov 9
Online open-book quiz 4
11
Nov 12, 14, 16
Sex, Marriage, and Family
Kinship and other Forms of Grouping
12
13
12
Nov 19, 21, 23
Politics, Power, and Violence
14
Nov 23
Online open-book quiz 5
13
Nov 26, 28, 30
Spirituality and Religion
15
14
Dec 3
Global Changes and the Role of Anthropology
16
In final exam period
FINAL EXAM
*
Course*Rules*
Electronic*Device*Policy*
Please set your cell phones to “silent” or shut them down. The use of computers and other
electronic devices is permitted according to the policy agreement upon in our Sep. 7 class.
Attendance*Policy*
Regular attendance is mandatory and highly recommended. Please note that the midterm and
final exams will focus on the course lectures, which include material and examples not covered
in the textbook. Catching up with the contents of missed class is your personal responsibility.
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Limits*of*Group*Work*
I am happy if you study for exams and online open-book quizzes together with fellow students,
but you have to complete online quizzes individually on your own.
Academic*Integrity*and*Discipline*
Academic Integrity: In order to maintain a culture of academic integrity, members of the
University of Waterloo are expected to promote honesty, trust, fairness, respect and
responsibility. See the Office of Academic Integrity webpage for more information.
Discipline: A student is expected to know what constitutes academic integrity, to avoid
committing academic offences, and to take responsibility for his/her actions. Check the Office of
Academic Integrity for more information. A student who is unsure whether an action constitutes
an offence, or who needs help in learning how to avoid offences (e.g., plagiarism, cheating) or
about “rulesfor group work/collaboration should seek guidance from the course professor,
academic advisor, or the Undergraduate Associate Dean. When misconduct has been found to
have occurred, disciplinary penalties will be imposed under Policy 71 Student Discipline. For
information on categories of offenses and types of penalties, students should refer to Policy 71 -
Student Discipline. For typical penalties check Guidelines for the Assessment of Penalties.
Grievances*and*Appeals*
Grievance: A student who believes that a decision affecting some aspect of his/her university life
has been unfair or unreasonable may have grounds for initiating a grievance. Read Policy 70 -
Student Petitions and Grievances, Section 4. When in doubt, please be certain to contact the
department’s administrative assistant who will provide further assistance.
Appeals: A decision made or penalty imposed under Policy 70 - Student Petitions and Grievances
(other than a petition) or Policy 71 - Student Discipline may be appealed if there is a ground. A
student who believes he/she has a ground for an appeal should refer to Policy 72 - Student
Appeals.
Accommodation*for*Students*with*Disabilities*
Note for students with disabilities: The AccessAbility Services office, located on the first floor of
the Needles Hall extension (1401), collaborates with all academic departments to arrange
appropriate accommodations for students with disabilities without compromising the academic
integrity of the curriculum. If you require academic accommodations to lessen the impact of your
disability, please register with the AS office at the beginning of each academic term.
Mental*Health*Support*
All of us need a support system. The faculty and staff in Arts encourage students to seek out mental
health supports if they are needed.
On Campus
Counselling Services: counselling.services@uwaterloo.ca / 519-888-4567 ext 32655
MATES: one-to-one peer support program offered by Federation of Students (FEDS) and
Counselling Services
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Health Services Emergency service: located across the creek form Student Life Centre
Off campus, 24/7
Good2Talk: Free confidential help line for post-secondary students. Phone: 1-866-925-5454
Grand River Hospital: Emergency care for mental health crisis. Phone: 519-749-433 ext. 6880
Here 24/7: Mental Health and Crisis Service Team. Phone: 1-844-437-3247
OK2BME: set of support services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or questioning teens in
Waterloo. Phone: 519-884-0000 extension 213
Full details can be found online at the Faculty of ARTS website
Download UWaterloo and regional mental health resources (PDF)
Download the WatSafe app to your phone to quickly access mental health support information
Territorial*Acknowledgement*
We acknowledge that we are living and working on the traditional territory of the Attawandaron
(also known as Neutral), Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee peoples. The University of Waterloo is
situated on the Haldimand Tract, the land promised to the Six Nations that includes 10 kilometres
on each side of the Grand River.
For more information about the purpose of territorial acknowledgements, please see the CAUT Guide to
Acknowledging Traditional Territory (PDF).
Academic*freedom*at*the*University*of*Waterloo*
Policy 33, Ethical Behaviour states, as one of its general principles (Section 1), “The University supports
academic freedom for all members of the University community. Academic freedom carries with it the
duty to use that freedom in a manner consistent with the scholarly obligation to base teaching and
research on an honest and ethical quest for knowledge. In the context of this policy, 'academic freedom'
refers to academic activities, including teaching and scholarship, as is articulated in the principles set out
in the Memorandum of Agreement between the FAUW and the University of Waterloo, 1998 (Article 6).
The academic environment which fosters free debate may from time to time include the presentation or
discussion of unpopular opinions or controversial material. Such material shall be dealt with as openly,
respectfully and sensitively as possible.” This definition is repeated in Policies 70 and 71, and in the
Memorandum of Agreement, Section 6.
*

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