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Study Guide

FINC13-307- Midterm Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 34 pages long!)

34 Pages
76 Views
Fall 2017

Department
FINC
Course Code
FINC13-307
Professor
amy
Study Guide
Midterm

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Bond Uni
FINC13-307
MIDTERM EXAM
STUDY GUIDE
instructions: while the original paper viewed the Mann gulch disaster as an organisational tragedy,
let us view it from the perspective of teamwork.
1. What happened in the Man Gulch Disaster?
a team of 16 “smokejumpers” fought a fire that they thought was small which ultimately claimed the
lives of 13 of them.
2. What are the official or expected roles and norms of the 16 people in the fire? were they
supposed to be a team or a group?
Team?
1. leader - makes decision based on situation
2. Second-in-command. - implements and follows up
3. crew members - clear fire
3. What does the author weick mean by “collapse of sense making”? How is the concept
manifested in the Mann gulch disaster?
the inability to make sense of whats happening in a changing and complex environment.
In the Mann gulch disaster,
1. the smokejumpers expected to find a fire that could be completely surrounded and isolated by
10.am. the next morning.
2. but when they arrived, what they saw and observed did not match their experience
3. and they could not make sense of the ambiguous situation (some could relaxing have food, take
pictures) which resulted in their inability to comprehend and make decisions.
4. why does “collapse of sensemaking” make teamwork more vulnerable?
because when people lose the ability to make sense of whats going on in a changing environment,
they form different mental models and therefore have different ideas on how to do things (dodges
with the escape fire, the rest could not make sense of his actions and ran)
it also significantly weakens the role structure of an organisation (in this case, the smokejumpers)
=> no defined roles, “every man for himself” “everyone is their own boss” mentality
5. how can teams retain resilient during uncertainty?
6. how is the knowledge from this case relevant to teamwork in contemporary
organisations?
the crew of smokejumpers at Mann gulch fulfils what it means to be an organisation.
Westley’s definition of an organisation: “a series of interlocking routines, habituated action patterns
that bring the same people together around the same activities in the same time and places”
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
1. the crew have routine, habituated action patterns. they come together from a common pool of
people, and while they had not come together at the same places or times, they did come together
around the same episode of fire.
2. the crew fits the 5 criteria for a simple organisational structure proposed by mintzberg
I. coordination by direct supervision
II. strategy planned at the top
III. little formalised behaviour
IV. organic structure
V. the person in charge tending to formulate plans intuitively - meaning that the plans are
generally a direct “extension of his own personality”
*structures like this are found most often in entrepreneurial firms
3. The crew has “generic subjectivity”
=> meaning that roles and rules exist that enable individuals to be interchanged with little
disruption to the ongoing pattern of interaction.
in the crew at Mann gulch there were at least 3 roles:
I. leader: sizes up the situation, makes decisions, yells orders, pick trails, sets the pace, and
identifies escape routes.
ii. 2nd in command: brings up the rear of the crew as it hikes, repeats orders, sees that the orders
are understood, helps the individuals coordinate their actions
=> tends to be closer to the crew and more of a buddy with them than does the leader.
iii. Crew member: clears a fire line around the fire, cleans up after the fire, and maintains trails
* THUS, THE CREW AT MANN GULCH IS AN ORGANISATION BY VIRTUE OF A ROLE
STRUCTURE OF A INTERLOCKING ROUTINES
early in the book, Maclean asks the question on “what the structure of a small outfit should be
when its business is to meet sudden danger and prevent disaster.” This question is timely because
the work of organisations is increasingly done in small temporary outfits in which the stakes are
high and where foul-ups can have serious consequences. Thus, if we understand what happened
at Mann gulch we may be able to learn some valuable lessons in how to conceptualise and cope
with contemporary organisations.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com

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Description
[FINC13-307] Comprehensive fall guide including any lecture notes, textbook notes and exam guides.find more resources at oneclass.com instructions: while the original paper viewed the Mann gulch disaster as an organisational tragedy, let us view it from the perspective of teamwork. 1. What happened in the Man Gulch Disaster? a team of 16 “smokejumpers” fought a fire that they thought was small which ultimately claimed the lives of 13 of them. 2. What are the official or expected roles and norms of the 16 people in the fire? were they supposed to be a team or a group? Team? 1. leader - makes decision based on situation 2. Second-in-command. - implements and follows up 3. crew members - clear fire 3. What does the author weick mean by “collapse of sense making”? How is the concept manifested in the Mann gulch disaster? the inability to make sense of whats happening in a changing and complex environment. In the Mann gulch disaster, 1. the smokejumpers expected to find a fire that could be completely surrounded and isolated by 10.am. the next morning. 2. but when they arrived, what they saw and observed did not match their experience 3. and they could not make sense of the ambiguous situation (some could relaxing have food, take pictures) which resulted in their inability to comprehend and make decisions. 4. why does “collapse of sensemaking” make teamwork more vulnerable? because when people lose the ability to make sense of whats going on in a changing environment, they form different mental models and therefore have different ideas on how to do things (dodges with the escape fire, the rest could not make sense of his actions and ran) it also significantly weakens the role structure of an organisation (in this case, the smokejumpers) => no defined roles, “every man for himself” “everyone is their own boss” mentality 5. how can teams retain resilient during uncertainty? 6. how is the knowledge from this case relevant to teamwork in contemporary organisations? the crew of smokejumpers at Mann gulch fulfils what it means to be an organisation. Westley’s definition of an organisation: “a series of interlocking routines, habituated action patterns that bring the same people together around the same activities in the same time and places” find more resources at oneclass.com
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