Study Guides (248,357)
Canada (121,502)
LING 1001 (11)
Midterm

LING Midterm Study Notes.docx

5 Pages
231 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Linguistics
Course
LING 1001
Professor
Karin Nault
Semester
Winter

Description
01/23/2014 Linguistic Performance: The way that they produce and comprehend language. The observable  realization of the potential: our performance is what we do with our linguistic competence.  Linguistic Competence: A person’s unseen potential to speak a language, which is stored in the  lexicon and mental grammar Phonology: The distribution of speech sounds.  Morphology: Facts about word formation Syntax: How words combine to form phrases and sentences Semantics: Meaning in sentences Lexicon: Consists of the collection of all the words that you know: what functions they serve. What they  refer to, how they are pronounced, and how they are related to other words Mental Grammar:  Stored form of rules that you know about your language. This is what a linguist is  actually trying to understand Grammar: A language system that is the set of all the elements and rules about phonetics, phonology,  morphology, syntax and semantics that make up a language.  Descriptive Grammars: Contains the rules that someone has deduced based on observing  speakers’ linguistic performance. This is the linguist’s description of the rules of language as it is spoken.  Prescriptive Grammar: The socially embedded notion of the “correct” or “proper” ways to use a  language Design Features of Language: Descriptive characteristics of language designed by Hockett Mode of Communication: The means by which messages are transmitted and received Ex:  Gestures or Voice Semanticity: The property requiring that all signals in a communication system have a meaning or a  function. Ex: The word “Pizza” should mean the same thing to the people you say it to. Or if someone says  a word that you don’t know, you wouldn’t just assume it is meaningless. Pragmatic Function: Communication systems must serve some useful purpose. Ex: To stay alive, ask  for food, influence others’ behaviour and finding out more about the world Interchangeability: The ability of individuals to both transmit and receive messages Cultural Transmission: Aspects of language that we can only acquire through communicative  interaction with other users of the system.  Arbitrariness:  Arbitrary refers to the fact that the meaning is not in any way predictable from the form;  nor is the form dictated by the meaning. The words of a language represent a connection between a group  of sounds or signs, which give the word its form (its sound) and a meaning, which the form can be said to  represent. Linguistic Sign: Form + Meaning = Linguistic Sign Sound Symbolism: Certain sounds occur in words not by virtue of being directly imitative of some  sound but rather simply by being evocative of a particular meaning. Ex: Words meaning small. The use of [i]  is small words creates a situation in which an aspect of the form i.e., the occurrence of [i] is influenced by  an aspect of the meaning i.e., smallness. Discreteness: The property of language that allows us to combine together discrete units in order to  create larger communication units. Ex: He is fast is composed of small discrete units like [h], [i], [I], [z], [f],  [ae], [s], and [t] Displacement: The ability of a language to communicate about things, actions, and ideas that are not  present 
More Less

Related notes for LING 1001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit