Study Guides (248,471)
Canada (121,570)
Biology (101)
BIOL 1010 (29)

respiriarty

6 Pages
123 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIOL 1010
Professor
gilliangass
Semester
Winter

Description
12/06/2013 URINARY SYSTEM (Chapter 26)   A. Introduction and Overview 1. As a consequence of metabolism, cells produce wastes which include: i. carbon dioxide ii. excess water  and ions iii. heat iv. nitrogenous wastes, including: a. uric acid b. urea c. creatinine 2. The organs that participate in waste elimination include: i. kidneys ii. lungs iii. skin (sudoriferous glands)  iv. gastrointestinal tract 3. The major function of the urinary system is to help maintain homeostasis by controlling the composition,  volume, and pressure of blood; it does so by removing and restoring selected amounts of water and  solutes. 4. The urinary system consists of: i.          two kidneys which perform the above functions and consequently produce urine ii.          two ureters which drain urine from the kidneys and transport it to the bladder. iii.         one urinary bladder which stores urine until it is ready to be expelled iv.         one urethra which transports urine from the urinary bladder to the exterior; in males, the urethra  also transports semen B. Kidneys 1. The paired kidneys are retroperitoneal organs attached to the posterior abdominal wall just above waist  level i.          they are positioned between the levels of the last thoracic and the third lumbar vertebrae ii.          they are partially protected by the eleventh and twelfth pairs of ribs iii.         the right kidney is slightly lower than the left because of the presence of the liver on the right side 2. External Anatomy: i.          near the center of the kidney's concave medial border is a depression called the hilus through which  travel: a. ureter b. blood vessels and lymphatic vessels c. nerves               the hilus is the entrance to a cavity in the kidney called the renal sinus ii.          the kidney is covered and protected by the renal fascia (part of the peritoneum), a layer of fat, and  the renal capsule (thin layer of connective tissue) that is closely adhered to the kidney   3. Internal Anatomy: i.          the kidney has:             a. outer layer called the cortex             b. inner region called the medulla ii.          the medulla contains cone shaped renal (medullary) pyramids whose apexes are called renal  papillae iii.         the cortex is divided into:             a. outer cortical zone             b. inner juxtamedullary zone               renal columns are portions of the cortex that extend between renal pyramids i.                     urine from the renal pyramids is delivered into minor calyces which merge to form major  calyces that deliver the urine into a large cavity called the renal pelvis (the renal pelvis is located within the  renal sinus­cavity that contains blood vessels and nerves) ii.                   the kidney receives blood via the renal arteries (large branches of the abdominal aorta) 4. Nephron (uriniferous tubule= nephron + collecting duct): i.          the nephron is the functional unit of the kidney which produces urine ii.          the nephron consists of two portions:             a. renal corpuscle                         b. renal tubule iii.         the renal corpuscle has two components:             a. network of capillary loops called the glomerulus               receives blood from an afferent arteriole               blood leaves the nephron in the efferent arteriole             b. surrounding the glomerulus is the glomerular (Bowman’s) capsule iv.         as blood flows into the capillary network that forms the glomerulus, a filtrate of the blood is formed  as fluid is forced out of the capillaries and through a layer of visceral epithelium (podocytes) covering the  capillaries and enters the capsular space.  The filtered fluid then flows into the renal tubule, which consists  of three segments:             a. proximal convoluted tubule (PCT)             b. loop of Henle (nephron loop)               it loops into the medulla               it consists of a descending limb and an ascending limb                         c. distal convoluted tubule (DCT) v.         the distal convoluted tubules of several nephrons are linked to one collecting duct iii.                  collecting ducts merge to form papillary ducts which drain into a minor calyx vii. there are two types of nephrons: a. cortical nephron -  usually has its glomerulus in the outer part of the cortex and its short loop of Henle penetrates only into  the outer region of the medulla b. juxtamedullary nephron
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit