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Study Guide

HISTORY 2SH3- Final Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 95 pages long!)


Department
History
Course Code
HISTORY 2SH3
Professor
Nancy Bouchier
Study Guide
Final

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McMaster
HISTORY 2SH3
Final EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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HISTORY 2SH3 LECTURE 1
Week 1.1
Introduction
In June 2016, Lawrence Martin, a Hamilton-born McMaster grad who is now an Ottawa-based
puli affais oluist, efleted o the ipotae of spot to Caadas histo i the Globe
and Mail. In his atile, etitled “pot elogs at the oe of Caadas “to, Mati laets
the tede of Caadia histoias to oelook the atios spotig heitage, espeiall as e
approach our sesquicentennial ou atios 5 birthday - in 2017. He writes:
I this ouse e ae goig to follo Matis lead ad t to get ou histo ight  foussig
a critical, academic gaze upon sport. But i this ouse e aet goig to fous upo the
minutiae of sport who won what game when.
Instead, like Martin, we are going to look at the big picture. We are going to view sport as a
much larger phenomenon that tells us something about who we are as Canadians our past,
our present, and our vision of the future.
And, since sporting culture is so rich and diverse its so uh oe tha the feats of geat
men on the playing fields of professional leagues like the NHL and CFL- we are going to take a
uh ilusie appoah tha Matis eaples ould suggest. We ae goig to look at the
myriad ways in which Canadians have played, and still play.
Lawrence Martin is quite right when he says that as a cultural institution sport indeed is a tie
that binds. But not always. Sometimes what we will talk about in this course might challenge
your notions of what sport is, which is part and parcel of understanding it as an indelible aspect
of culture for at least three thousand-or-so years.
Our earliest human records of sport competition, the ancient Olympic Games, you might recall
from media coverage of any recent Olympic Games, date back to 776 BCE, at a time when
naked male Greek athletes represented their polis (or city state) to compete in athletic events
as part of a religious festival that honoured the god Zeus. Times have changed, and how sport is
played has changed, but the phenomenon of sport in culture and sport as culture remains.
B the ed of this fist of to letues ou ill egi to udestad hat is spot a it oe
deeply by learning about:
- how ubiquitous and complicated the social phenomena of sport is
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- how recent Canadian governments have defined sport and identified its benefits
Ubiquitous Sport
We ae goig to egi ou disussio of the uestio, hat is spot, to help get us stated i
our survey of its history in Canada. When many of you signed up for this course you probably
had a very good idea what you thought the course was going to be about.
The authors of our textbook, Morrow and Wamsley, begin their survey of the history of
Caadia spot ith a deep siple delaatio that, Sport is a form of culture recognized by all
Caadias.
This is so tue. It doest atte hethe e ae e Caadias o Aoigial peoples, hethe
we are young or old, or what our ethnic or social class background is, all of us have been
exposed to sport (and play and games) in one way or another at some time or another. We take
sport for granted, so much so that while many of us love it, we rarely think about it and unpack
what it means to us as individuals, or to us as Canadians.
Think about it. Youe all likel take histo ouses i high shool ad uiesit, ut I et e
few of you have taken a course specifically focusing on sport exploring what it means to us
both in the past and in our daily lives.
Why? If you look around sport is as important a part of our daily lives as many other aspects of
ultue ad soiet. Could it e that spot is so ipotat to us that e just dot at to put a
itial gaze to it? Could it e that spots e atue – its playful non-instrumental, joyful, and
often times unstructured way of being is somehow devalued by us whether intentionally or
unintentionally?
At this moment I would like for each of you to pause for a second, look around, and think about
the many sports that exist out there and the myriad ways that sport is played by young and old,
by males and females, and by people from all sorts of backgrounds. Then think about the ways
in which sport touches your lives.
You might be wearing - as I am - a tennis shirt, or a pair of running sneakers, or a baseball cap.
All of these atiles of lothig i  gadpaets da ould hae ee o ol o a spots
field, ad it ould hae ee e stage ideed fo a feale to e see i the. M othes
parents, born in 1894 and 1903, would not have seen respectable females wearing such things
out in public. Yet nowadays sportswear is so commonplace that we hardly even notice when it
is worn by just about every sort of person, young and old alike.
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