PNB 3XE3 Quiz: PNB 3XE3 - Chapter 10 question bank

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Published on 9 Mar 2020
School
McMaster University
Department
Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour
Course
PNB 3XE3
Chapter 10:
Homework 1
1. Your book describes a test involving pairs of boxes, with a worm in one of each pair
of boxes. The experimenter wants to test the hypothesis that she has psychic powers.
After the character probes one pair of boxes she is not satisfied she can reject the
null hypothesis. What is the smallest number of pairs of boxes she needed to
correctly probe in order to satisfy the conventions of our field using 0.05 as Fisher’s
p-value, and to reject the null hypothesis that she is not psychic?
a) 10
b) 8
c) 5
d) 6
2. By convention, psychologists usually set the p-value at…
a) chance
b) 50%
c) 10%
d) 5%
3. Which of the following appears in an incorrect order?
a) Collect data, make predictions, fit model to the data
b) Collect data, made predictions, calculate the p-value
c) Collect data, make predictions
d) All of the above
4. Which of the following is false?
a) You can prove the alternative hypothesis
b) You can falsify the null hypothesis
c) If your evidence leads you to rule out the null hypothesis, you have more confidence
in your alternative hypothesis
d) All of the above
5. The idea of using the p-value to estimate the probability of the null hypothesis, and
the idea of testing the null hypothesis against the alternative hypothesis can be
attributed to:
a) Pearson
b) Neyman
c) Neyman and Pearson, respectively
d) Fisher, and then Pearson and Neyman, respectively
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6. What is the alternative hypothesis for the following question: Does watching violent
television content cause aggressive behaviour?
a) People who watch violent television programs will behave more aggressively
compared to those who don’t
b) People who watch violent television will have similar behaviour to those who don’t
c) Watching violent television does not predict the rate of aggressive behaviour
d) there will be no difference in the behaviour of people who watch violent television
compared to those who don’t
7. How could you tell whether the data collected from JIG:SAW employees and the
data from non-employees were meaningfully different?
a) It is not possible to know with certainty, but only to know the probability that they are
different
b) Null hypothesis significance testing
c) If the observed data allows you to probabilistically rule out the null hypothesis, then
you might believe the alternative hypothesis that the two are meaningfully different
d) All of the above
8. What is a test statistic?
a) The size of your effect divided by the standard error found across samples
b) The signal divided by the noise
c) A test of how good the hypothesis is compared to how bad it is
d) All of the above
9. What does it mean when a researcher rejects the null hypothesis at the 0.05 level?
a) There is a 5% chance of getting such an extreme result by chance if the null
hypothesis is true
b) There is a 5% chance of getting such an extreme result by chance if the null
hypothesis is false
c) There is a 5% chance that there is a difference between the null and alternative
populations
d) There is a 95% chance that the research hypothesis is true
10. Null hypothesis significance testing involves which ideas?
a) Evaluating evidence using competing hypotheses
b) Using probabilities to evaluate evidence
c) Both of the above
d) None of the above
11. What are the major problems with null hypothesis significance testing?
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