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POLSCI 3VV3- Midterm Exam Guide - Comprehensive Notes for the exam ( 46 pages long!)


Department
Political Science
Course Code
POLSCI 3VV3
Professor
James Ingram
Study Guide
Midterm

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McMaster
POLSCI 3VV3
Midterm EXAM
STUDY GUIDE

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Lecture 1 - 5 September 2017
Demos (people) + Kratos (have power)
Default. The many have the power.
Running a Course Democratically
The students found it interesting, but they spent all their time figuring out
what to do.
You have to decide, but also you have to decide what to decide.
They felt they learned more about democracy than if they had read the
literature.
Online Discussion
1/3 of the course is devoted to online discussion.
Tutorial groups, but freeform and online.
Term is broken into two.
As we go through the various topics, weʼre responsible for generating
questions and comments as well as responding to other peopleʼs
comments and questions.
Do this three times before the midterm and three times after the midterm.
12 posts (comments and replies) minimum.
Grade is calculated based on how much youʼve contributed and constructed
on the conversation.
“How constructively you have participated.
Attendance/Participation
Attendance will be taken.
If you miss two, donʼt worry. Just let Ingram know.
You will not be punished for not talking in class.
Those people who participate more can gain up to 3% for participating more.
Make a name tag.
Midterm and Take Home Exam
Midterm is closed book.
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find more resources at oneclass.com
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Lecture 2 - 11 September 2017
Origins of Democracy
Democracy comes from ancient Athens.
Demos + kratos (the people have the power).
Start with this.
But: this is probably wrong.
Throughout the Middle East, societies had organized their societies
democratically for several hundred years before.
If you wanted to give a birthplace to democracy, it would be
somewhere in Syria or Iraq.
If you say that democracy is that the people have power, all kinds of
societies fall under this description.
A ton of indigenous and “underdeveloped” societies.
If you donʼt have a standing army, the people are going to have the
power, because thereʼs no possibility for tyranny.
The Western tradition of democracy begins in Athens, but itʼs a problematic
starting point. Donʼt just say democracy was invented in Athens.
Democratic Athens
Athens in the 5th century BCE.
General outline of what happens here is important:
After a period of immense social conflicts, where Athens has been
under kings or dominated by wealthy families, Athens begins to
democratize.
508: Cleisthenes, 500: Solon
Increasingly, ordinary Athenians come to acquire more and more
political power.
Changes immensely!
Were able to organize so that they could take on greater empires
like Persia.
Two important developments with huge political implications:
1) Trireme
Athenians started making lots of them.
Very mobile and militarily efficient, but they need a huge number
of oarsmen.
2) Hoplite phalanx
Hoplite: basic infantryman.
Phalanx: a formation.
The Athenians got very good at war and empire, but also at
commerce.
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find more resources at oneclass.com
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